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Yee: Colo. massacre underscores need for gun bill

State Sen. Leland Yee quickly linked this morning’s massacre at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater to his own bill to change California’s assault-weapons policy:

“My thoughts and prayers go out to the victims of this horrific tragedy and their families. These events are shocking to all of us and sadly remind us of the carnage that is possible when assault weapons get into the wrong hands. It is imperative that we take every step possible to eliminate the types of senseless killings witnessed in Aurora, Colorado. We must limit access to weapons that can carry massive rounds of bullets or that can be easily reloaded. SB 249 is a step in that direction and should be approved by the Legislature as soon as possible.”

Yee’s SB 249 would close what the San Francisco Democrat calls a loophole in the state’s assault-weapons law, already among the nation’s most stringent.

Magazines that can be removed by a normal push button, in combination with features such as a pistol grip and telescoping stock, are banned by California law; the law essentially requires that magazines be fixed, or removed or replaced with the use of a tool, in order to slow down the reloading process.

In an apparent effort to get around the law, gun makers have created a new mechanism that lets the magazine be easily removed by the tip of a bullet or in some cases by just putting a small magnet over the “bullet button,” basically recreating a normal push-button and letting magazines be changed within seconds. Yee’s bill, now pending before the Assembly Appropriations Committee, would prohibit this.

The alleged gunman in Colorado reportedly was armed with an AR-15 assault rifle, a shotgun and a Glock handgun.