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Carly Fiorina’s first presidential video

While Hillary Clinton was in Santa Clara on Tuesday calling for gender equity in Silicon Valley, one of the tech industries foremost female ex-CEOs was launching her first presidential campaign video.

Carly Fiorina, who led HP from 1999 to 2005 and was California’s 2010 Republican U.S. Senate nominee, talks in the two-minute video about her career, America, family, faith and conservatism – with nary a demon sheep in sight.

The video is from the newly formed super PAC Carly for America, which the Washington Post reports is laying the groundwork for a potential candidacy. It coincides with Fiorina’s scheduled appearance Thursday at the Conservative Political Action Conference, a four-day event in Maryland featuring a slew of possible presidential contenders.

Fiorina – no longer a Californian, having moved to Virginia a few years ago – has been setting the stage for a campaign for the past several months by speaking at conferences, visiting early-primary states, and wooing potential contributors and staffers.

So far, she’s having trouble finding traction and name recognition; most polls of the potential Republican field don’t include her. It’s very early, of course, and she has time to get her name out there – but if she’s actually angling for something other than the Oval Office, it might be useful to remember Fiorina about a year ago joined the advisory board of a pro-Rick Perry “dark money” group.

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Lofgren defends Obama at immigration hearing

Rep. Zoe Lofgren rose to President Obama’s defense Tuesday during the House Judiciary Committee’s hearing on his “executive overreach on immigration.”

In his opening statement, Judiciary Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., said the president “has just announced one of the biggest constitutional power grabs ever by a president.”

“The Obama Administration has crossed the line from any justifiable use of its authority to a clear violation of his constitutional responsibility to faithfully execute the laws,” Goodlatte said, adding there’s a difference between setting prosecutorial priorities and “setting enforcement-free zones for millions of unlawful aliens.”

“By boldly proclaiming that there will be no possibility of removal for millions of unlawful aliens, President Obama eliminates entirely any deterrent effect our immigration laws have,” he said. “He states plainly that those laws can be ignored with impunity. Such actions will entice others around the world to come here illegally, just like his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program encouraged tens of thousands of unaccompanied alien minors and families from Central America to make the dangerous trek to the United States.”

“By acting lawlessly and assuming legislative power, the Obama Administration is driving full speed ahead to a constitutional crisis, tilting the scales of our three-branch government in his favor and threatening to unravel our system of checks and balances,” Goodlatte concluded. “Rather than working constructively with the new men and women Americans elected to represent them in Congress, the President is making his relationship with Congress increasingly toxic by unconstitutionally acting on his own. Tragically, President Obama’s shortsighted actions have further set back congressional efforts to enact legislation to reform our broken immigration system.”

But Lofgren, D-San Jose, who is the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee, said while the president can’t change the law, he can take action within it – as has every president since Eisenhower.

“The President’s actions are lawful. They are also smart, because they will allow DHS to focus limited resources on serious criminals, recent arrivals, and gang members. Finally, they are consistent with basic American values, like accountability, family unity, and compassion, Lofgren said.

“The legal question isn’t even a close one,” she later added. “The President has clear legal authority to defer removals when it’s in the national interest. Chief Justice Roberts reaffirmed that principle just two years ago – our immigration laws recognize this authority – past Presidents have used this authority regularly. Our President is doing so now and I, for one, am grateful that he is.”

4

Lawmakers urge Obama to consult them on Iraq

Rep. Barbara Lee and a Virginia Republican have lead 78 other House members in urging President Obama to seek Congressional approval before taking any military action in Iraq.

Barbara Lee (Dec-2010)Lee, D-Oakland, and Rep. Scott Rigell, R-Va., last summer led independent letters calling on Obama to consult Congress before taking military action in Syria. Now they’ve joined together on a letter sent to the president Thursday.

“We do not believe intervention could be either quick or easy,” they wrote. “And we doubt it would be effective in meeting either humanitarian or strategic goals, and that it could very well be counter-productive.”

The lawmakers called for a political settlement involving all segments of the Iraqi population.

“As you consider options for U.S. intervention, we write to urge respect for the constitutional requirements for using force abroad,” they wrote. “The Constitution vests in Congress the power and responsibility to authorize offensive military action abroad. The use of military force in Iraq is something the Congress should fully debate and authorize.”

Besides Rigell, other Republicans signing the letter included Chris Gibson, R-N.Y.; John Duncan Jr., R-Tenn.; Walter Jones, R-N.C.; Reid Ribble, R-Wisc.; Justin Amash, R-Mich.; Matt Salmon, R-Ariz.;

Besides Lee, other Bay Area members signing the letter included Mike Honda, D-San Jose; Sam Farr, D-Santa Cruz; Zoe Lofgren, D-San Jose; Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto; Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo; George Miller, D-Martinez; and Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael.

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What Eric Cantor’s loss might mean to you

Rep. Eric Cantor, the Virginia Republican who was defeated in a primary election Tuesday by tea-party challenger Dave Brat, will step down as House Majority Leader.

Cantor’s upset defeat has repercussions far beyond Virginia’s 7th Congressional District, and even far beyond the Beltway. When the second-most-powerful Republican in Congress is taken down by a challenge from within his own party, the political and policy implications are sure to be significant. Here are a few:

1.) Immigration reform

Cantor’s loss probably means any shred of chance for comprehensive immigration reform in the foreseeable future is now gone.

One of Brat’s biggest criticisms of Cantor was that Cantor favored “amnesty” by supporting some sort of path to citizenship for children of undocumented immigrants. Actually, Politico is reporting that a poll found most of the voters in that district – including most Republicans – favor a plan that would include letting undocumented immigrants without criminal records gain legal status.

Nonetheless, I think the Washington Post’s Chris Cillizza is right when he says Cantor’s defeat will make any House Republican who’d been considering supporting some similar reform think again.

Meanwhile, immigration reform activists say Cantor’s loss is the nail in the coffin, and so are urging President Obama to offer deportation relief and other forms of administrative relief immediately.

2.) California’s clout

Cantor was the GOP’s number two in the House; House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Bakersfield, is number three. But Cantor’s loss doesn’t necessarily mean McCarthy’s ascension – a bunch of House Republicans already are jockeying to snap up Cantor’s post.

As both a Californian and a national GOP leader, McCarthy has had to walk a knife-edge on immigration reform; he has called for legal status, though perhaps not citizenship, for undocumented immigrants without criminal records. If Cantor’s loss makes House Republicans gun-shy about speaking up on immigration reform, McCarthy – along with other California Republicans like Jeff Denham and David Valadao – may be in the majority’s minority, and that’s not a great place to be when you’re gunning for a higher party leadership post.

More, after the jump…
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Carly Fiorina to advise Rick Perry-related group

Former California Republican U.S. Senate nominee and Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina has signed on to advise a “dark money” group tied to Texas Gov. Rick Perry

Carly FiorinaFiorina, 59, of Virginia, will serve on the advisory board of Americans for Economic Freedom, a “501(c)(4) that examines and promotes policies that work to create opportunity, and does not engage in direct political advocacy,” according to its news release.

The Houston Chronicle reported the group’s founding last September as “aimed at helping Gov. Rick Perry lay the foundation for a another presidential run” and launched with “more than $200,000 in leftover cash from a now-defunct Super PAC that raised millions for Perry’s failed 2012 bid.” The group can take unlimited, completely anonymous contributions; Perry strategist Jeff Miller, a former major fundraiser for California Republicans, is its CEO.

“From small business owners to CEOs, business leaders have a deep understanding of the policies that help create jobs, opportunity and innovation,” Miller said in Wednesday’s news release. “We are proud to have Carly’s guidance on our board, and look forward to our continued efforts to promote policies that bolster economic freedom and strengthen the U.S.”

Fiorina said that as a businesswoman, “I’m proud to stand with an organization that values and understands the prosperity that is created through smart economic policies. I look forward to working with AEF to increase our understanding of how to create American jobs and focus on economic growth.”

Fiorina, formerly of Los Altos Hills, was chairwoman and CEO of Hewlett-Packard from 1999 to 2005. In 2010, she defeated former Rep. Tom Campbell and Assemblyman Chuck DeVore in the GOP senatorial primary, and then lost to incumbent Barbara Boxer that November.

She became a vice-chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee in mid-2011 in order to help Republicans in their failed bid to retake control of the U.S. Senate in 2012; she also co-chaired the California campaign of 2012 GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Last September, she was named chairwoman of the American Conservative Union Foundation.

2

Bay Area House members offer Postal Service bills

Two Bay Area House members went postal Wednesday, introducing legislation to protect and update the U.S. Postal Service’s assets.

Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, introduced H.Res. 466, which would urge the Postal Service to halt all sales of historic postal buildings across the nation and permanently preserve them.

Berkeley Post Office“These historic post offices are an irreplaceable part of our nation’s history. They belong to the American people, and shouldn’t be sold without community input,” Lee said in a news release. “Historic post office buildings are an integral part of our cultural heritage and should not be used as a bargaining chip in resolving the Postal Service’s financial woes.”

In the bipartisan omnibus Appropriations bill passed this month, lawmakers called upon the USPS to halt sales of historic post offices until the Office of the Inspector General publishes its investigation on the processes and plans used for the sale and preservation of historic properties. Lee’s resolution expands upon that effort to ensure that these national landmarks are permanently preserved for their communities.

“The East Bay values and cherishes the Berkeley Post Office,” she said. “This bill would ensure that historic post offices across the country, including the Berkeley Post office, remain as a cornerstone of our community.”

Meanwhile, Rep. Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael, joined with Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., to introduce a bill requiring modernization of the Postal Service’s outdated vehicle fleet.

Grumman LLVThe Postal Service owns and operates the world’s largest civilian vehicle fleet: 192,000 mail delivery vehicles that are driven 4.3 million miles per day. More than 141,000 are aging Grumman LLVs, which average only 10 miles per gallon; this vehicle first went into service in 1987, and most have reached the end of their 24-year operational lifespan.

HR 3963, the Federal Leadership in Energy Efficient Transportation (FLEET) Act of 2014, would require the USPS to reduce its petroleum consumption by 2 percent each year for the next 10 years. The aim is to reduce fuel spending while increasing efficiency; the Union of Concerned Scientists estimates the bill would save the Postal Service an estimated 150 million gallons of fuel over the next ten years, worth about $400 million, Huffman’s office said.

“The Postal Service is crippled by an inefficient, outdated fleet, and the vast majority of these vehicles are reaching the end of their operational lives,” Huffman said in a news release. “The FLEET Act will help us invest in a modern, efficient Postal Service fleet. Our nation’s largest civilian fleet should serve as a global leader in efficiency and innovation.”

Shirley ChisholmIn other postal news, Lee is scheduled to be joined by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-San Francisco; Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo; and former Rep. Lynn Woolsey, D-Petaluma, on Saturday at Mills College in Oakland for the rollout of the Shirley Chisholm Forever® stamp.

This 37th stamp in the Black Heritage Series honors Chisholm, who was the first African American woman elected to Congress and who ran for president in 1972. She was the first African American and the second woman ever to seek a major party’s presidential nomination.

Lee first met Chisholm at Mills College in 1972, and organized Chisholm’s Northern California primary campaign that year. She first introduced legislation in 2005 expressing Congress’s sense that a commemorative stamp should be issued in Chisholm’s honor. The stamp image – designed by art director Ethel Kessler and featuring a color portrait of Chisholm by artist Robert Shetterly – will be unveiled Saturday.

The unveiling ceremony will be followed by panel discussion on House Democrats’ “When Women Succeed, America Succeeds” economic agenda, just like one that Pelosi, Speier and Lee did last week in San Francisco.