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Development sites in Fremont

By Matt Artz
Tuesday, June 23rd, 2009 at 8:54 am in Development, Uncategorized.

The City Council this evening will once again discuss Fremont’s plan that will guide development through 2030.  Yay.

So where are new buildings likely to sprout during the next 20 years? The city has a draft list. Here it is:

1) Decoto Road from Fremont Boulevard up to Paseo Padre Parkway

2) The Shinn Terminus, which isn’t far from Quarry Lakes and would be part of the Dumbarton Rail project that may never come to pass.

3) Central Park – This was added because Councilmember Anu Natarajan wanted to discuss the idea of a restaurant/tea house  in the park.

4) Mowry Gateway – That’s the chunk of Mowry just east of I-880. Now that Puppy Love has closed, it’s ripe for redevelopment.

5) Grimmer Boulevard Corridor – This is the part of Grimmer in south Fremont west of I-880 Oops. I was looking at the wrong opportunity site. It’s Grimmer between Central Park and the future Warm Springs BART station.

6) Fremont Boulevard Corridor – They want to build a trolley down Fremont Boulevard.

7) Pacific Commons

8) Warm Springs Bart station area

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  • Marty

    If there’s mention of the Henkel site could you relay it here?

  • Jon

    So are they just giving up on the Centerville Redevelopment Area now?

  • Matt Artz

    Jon, I’m guessing Centerville is included as part of the Fremont Boulevard Corridor.

  • Gus Morrison

    Item 5 – there is no Grimmer west of I880. I bet you mean west of I680.

    And I’m guessing all these items are commercial, as opposed to residential?

  • Jon Simon

    I’m a big fan of number smiley face with sunglasses.

  • Glenn

    Decoto Road – That’s all built up on the south side between Fremont Blvd and Paseo Padre, residential and commercial. The north side has a nice church in the middle, with some old homes scattered, St Vincent DePaul thrift and the abandoned Rite Aid. Are those history?

    A tea house in Central Park actually sounds nice. But then I wouldn’t have minded BART on raised tracks behind the lake, either.

    Mowry Gateway – And freshly painted, too. But the whole thing could definitely use a re-do. If Whole Foods really wants something on Mowry, this is close to 880..

    Trolley down Fremont Blvd – Interesting. I’ve heard this before, but figured it was whimsy. I don’t know if it makes sense to sacrifice auto lanes for this just yet, especially while there aren’t that many big destinations on Fremont Blvd. Sure trollies are cool, and they are easier to grok than a random bus system for out-of-towners, but what’s the plan? Will it go to Fremont BART, at least? I guess I’d like to hear more about this.

    I also noted that the recent Argus map of the 84 project was drawn as if there would be a fly-over from Paseo to the new road east towards Union City. Is that true? Or will it just be a standard 4-way with lights?

  • SMALLS

    We need a Trolley like we need another Lew Wolf project to turn the city upside down!(yes I was a supporter of the A’s to fremont. I think this blog is more peaceful with out them)

    I would like to see something at the park. I am not to sure how well it would do. I like the idea of a coffee house with a big outdoor seating area close to the water?

    I would rather see a another Water Park before a Trolley Car on Fremont, Morwry, or Niles Blvd.

  • Doug

    U.S. cities with Light Rail systems in operation:
    1. Baltimore / 640K (population – 2000 Census)
    2. Boston / 591
    3. Buffalo / 276
    4. Cleveland / 444
    5. Dallas / 1.23M
    6. Denver / 567
    7. Fort Worth / 653
    8. Jersey City / 241
    9. Kenosha / 97
    10. Memphis / 671
    11. New Orleans / 223
    12. Newark / 281
    13. Philadelphia / 1.45M
    14. Pittsburgh / 313
    15. Portland / 537
    16. Sacramento / 454
    17. St. Louis / 353
    18. Salt Lake City / 179
    19. San Diego / 1.26M
    20. San Francisco / 930
    21. San Jose / 930
    22. Seattle / 582
    23. Tampa / 332

    US cities with Light Rail systems approved or actively proposed:
    Albuquerque, NM / 504
    Anchorage, AK / 279
    Aspen, CO / 6
    Austin, TX / 709
    Birmingham, AL / 230
    Burlington, VT / 39
    Charleston, SC / 107
    Charlotte, NC (X2) / 630
    Charlottesville, WV / 40
    Chesapeake, MD / 220
    Cincinnati, OH (X2)
    Colorado Springs, CO / 372
    Columbus, OH / 733
    Detroit, MI / 918
    Hampton, VA / 145
    Honolulu, HI / 377
    Indianapolis, IN / 785
    Kansas City, MO / 447
    Louisville, KY / 555
    Madison, WI / 223
    Milwaukee, WI / 602
    Minneapolis, MN (X2)
    Nashville, TN / 552
    Oklahoma City, OK / 537
    Omaha, NE / 427
    Orlando, FL / 220
    Phoenix, AZ / 1.5M
    Roanoke, VA / 92
    Raleigh-Durham, NC / 356-209
    Richmond, VA / 192
    San Antonio, TX / 1.3M
    Spokane, WA / 198
    Tacoma, WA / 197

    Why not Fremont, CA / 211?

  • Marty

    Matt, did the future of the Henkel property come up? Is there any active industrial activity at the “Shinn Terminus”, which I take to where Shinn St ends on the other (south) side of Alameda Creek?

  • Matt Artz

    Marty, Henkel didn’t come up. Mayor has said he expects some development with housing. There’s a trucking company and a gypsum plant at Shinn.

  • Charlotte Allen

    According to their comments at last night’s Council meeting, U.S. Gypsum would like to see residential development on their property at Shinn Terminus. I’m wondering how this fits with the City’s vision of high-density development in transit centers. Sounds like the planning department has a vision of BART and CalTrain building new terminals at Shinn Terminus, thus justifying high-density residential development at that location.

    I think the City ought to confine residential development in the new General Plan to the already-identified transit centers, and not cater to landowners by imagining a new transit center where one doesn’t exist, and isn’t likely to.

  • http://www.shahforcouncil.com Ishan Shah

    I think Charlotte brings up a very good point. Development is beneficial. But you really cant let one type of it go crazy. There needs to be balance. I’m sure developers don’t mind as much as to what they’re building. They just want the business!

  • Rick Muncie

    “Decoto Road – That’s all built up on the south side between Fremont Blvd and Paseo Padre, residential and commercial. The north side has a nice church in the middle, with some old homes scattered, St Vincent DePaul thrift and the abandoned Rite Aid. Are those history?”

    Maybe they mean the oddly-situated farm between Fremont and Paseo that was confirmed here to be owned by the city and leased by the farmer. That land sticks out like a sore thumb, since it won’t be used for Route 84/East-West Connector anymore.

  • Rick Muncie

    “Mowry Gateway – That’s the chunk of Mowry just east of I-880. Now that Puppy Love has closed, it’s ripe for redevelopment.”

    Now that Puppy Love love is closed it’s ripe for development?? Hopefully that is your idea of a joke. Mowry just east of I-880 needs serious work. Something has to be done with the Cinedome 8 East Site. I’d like to see someone buy it and make it Cinearts Fremont (Century’s brand of independent theaters), but alas we might not have the demographics to support an independent film theater here. If something won’t be done, should be demolished for something else (Performing Arts Center? Makes more sense there than Little Kabul).

    The rest of that center, besides Olive Garden and arguably Market Broiler, is dead. The only thing I like about it besides Olive Garden is that instead of getting gelato at OG, you go cheaper and better by running over to Gelato Classico after your OG meal.

    On the other side of the street, I’ve been pissed off ever since Massimo’s closed it’s deli, leaving only it’s restaurant. Now I don’t know where in the tri city area where you can get a delicious coppa sandwich (coppa is my favorite deli meat but is expensive and hard to find). The row where Puppy Love was is dead besides the Indian businesses and perhaps the one dentist there. The rest of it pretty slow, besides Lucky and OSH. I’m not seeing what can be done there.

  • MikeTeeVee

    Charlotte said: “Sounds like the planning department has a vision of BART and CalTrain building new terminals at Shinn Terminus”

    Once upon a time, there were proposals, from passenger rail advocates, for a BART transfer station near Shinn. As far as I know, Fremont planners/staffers/officials were never interested in that idea.

    The north end of Shinn St. is less than a mile from Fremont BART by foot or bike.

  • Charlotte Allen

    Mike, thanks for the information. I didn’t know that. If Fremont officials weren’t interested then, it sounds like they’re interested now.

    And I meant to say “Amtrak” rather than “CalTrain” as it’s Amtrak that runs the trains along the East Bay Corridor

  • Andy

    I think one business that will make money in fremont is a asian themed bar or club.

  • SMALLS

    Doug 19 of your top 23 have pro teams in those cities as well. If the A’s would of come here I could maybe see your point.

    Where or what is worth a light rail system in Fremont?

  • Doug

    Smalls, which comes first the chicken or the egg?

    Possibly, if Fremont had a viable public transit system in place prior to the A’s announced move there wouldn’t have been as much of an argument about traffic and parking.

    The argument now is we don’t have the housing density to support it. To which I offer the same question.

    Take a peek at the list of cities planning light rail. How many of them have a ball club. There’s more to it than a MLB franchise. It’s called infrastructure. Build it and they will come.

  • http://fremontcitizensnetwork.com Vinnie Bacon

    So much to discuss on this thread. :)

    Mowry Gateway – Yes, this is a horrible location. I lived one block from there, but when I first heard of the Puppy Love protests I had no idea where the store was. That whole stretch of stores is out of sight. The other side of Farwell (by the retired theaters) is even worse off. (But it was an excellent place to teach my kid how to ride a bike. No cars to worry about.) This is the kind of retail location, next to the freeway, that retailers should be interested in, let we’ve let this become rather vacant. I think we should try and revitalize these areas (i.e. the Hub) before trying to invent new retails centers.

    Shinn Connection – This was proposed a while back and it didn’t make sense to me. I believe the idea was to link BART with Amtrak/ACE. I didn’t get how this would work. High density without transit is not what we need.

    Light Rail on Fremont – I love the idea but I’m cautious. There was a famous paper on light rail called ‘A Desire Named Streetcar’ that talked about light rail projects where the ridership was overestimated and costs were underestimated. If we really want this, we need to start planning that area for the kind of development that would generate the demand. The problem with the chicken and the egg analogy is that the chicken (the light rail) is an all or none proposition. In this economy, it’s probably unrealistic to even talk about it right now. The egg (development that is appropriate near a light rail corridor) can, and should, be planned for now.

  • Doug

    “If we really want this, we need to start planning that area for the kind of development that would generate the demand.”

    Vinnie, exactly. There needs to be a plan. Lay the groundwork, have a vision. Execute over time. If we don’t plan for alternative modes of inner-city transportation our ability to get from here to there will become more difficult and time consuming, not to mention frustrating.

    Pacific Commons was designed with the auto in mind and not much else.

  • Fremont Lifer

    Just wanted to give an extremely rare (for me) atta-boy to the City for whatever they did to get us a veteran’s clinic here in town. This is just the kind of business that we need, and it’s great that vets won’t have to go across they Bay or over the hills anymore for their care.

    Even though the article says the clinic may only be open for five years, it’s a good start. I guess the next question is, what is the City doing to pursuade the VA to build their permanent East Bay multispecialty care center here? Seems like it would fit in pretty well near Washington Township and Kaiser, no?

    Even though it won’t open until January, it’s coming, and that’s a good thing.