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Solyndra cancels IPO

By Matt Artz
Friday, June 18th, 2010 at 12:32 pm in Uncategorized.

The ballyhooed Fremont company is taking out a loan instead. Read more here.

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  • http://Www.ishanforcouncil.com Ishan Shah

    Can’t say this surprises me. Solyndras prospectus was laden with negative points when i read through it :(

  • FremontResident2010

    Read Tesla’s prospectus for some good reading. Tesla’s president will not focus on the Tesla business. The Tesla roadster, its only car, will stop production at the end of 2011 with no replacement until 2014 or so, and no guarantees on when the sedan will go on sale. That means there will be some 2 years when Tesla will have no products on sale.

    Tesla’s prospectus is full of surprises. Nevertheless, I hope that it survives and succeeds. It would be cool to have one of those sedans!

  • Jon Simon

    Tesla’s long-term prospects are:
    1. Get bought out.
    2. A miracle happens and battery technology leaps forward then heads straight into production while all the real car companies of the world sit on their thumbs.

    Not good.

    However, their short term prospects are awesome:
    1. Get lots of government money to pay our salaries then buy mansions and fancy, gas-guzzling cars that actually work well.
    2. Do IPO. Watch fools in stock market frenzy. Buy even bigger mansion and more cars.

    It’s not the dot-com bubble, it’s the battery bubble.

  • VOR

    Ahhh, but think of all the lithium just discovered in that peace-loving country called Afghanistan.

  • bbox231

    Re Bubbles –

    Seems like the peanut gallery has adopted this phrase to describe the rise and fall of any variety of markets and their related economics. . . .some of which win, some lose – those who play may prosper or will frequently lose –

    Remember the mil/aero “bubble” that fueled a national economy for four decades ?

    Even the dot-cimt bubble that J. Simon alludes to was an active contributor to our economy for at least a decade.

    But the important point is that in both cases, many technologies and industries continue to struggle forward to service customers, deliver goods, and compete in the open markets (employing folks and sustaining families as they go) – as a direct result of the “bubbles” you infer have “burst”. . . .

    Re Prospectus writing –
    This art form has definately taken a significant turn following on to the mortgage meltdown. In partial response to the relative “optimism” of the past, when brokerage and audit firms would actively promote – todays’ prospectus focusses on the relative risk and uncertainty inherent in almost any modern-day business venture. Read 20 or 30 of these documents written since 2007 and then compare to those written prior – -

    Now, if you’re truly concerned about discussing an economic house of cards (e.g., bubbles) – you know, something that is doomed to implode in the near term, let’s talk about public employee pensions…..

  • Jon Simon

    The electric car market in the US has bubbled up a few times. The beginning of the 20th century, the 70s, and late 90s, and now again. Battery lifetime and range haven’t changed significantly since the invention of lithium ion batteries. The RAV 4EV has approximately the same range as the Mini E. The tech still just isn’t there for mainstream adoption.

    That said, I’ll seriously consider an EV as a third car in a few years if the price is reasonable.

  • bbbox231

    The EV is likely not made “effective” by technology – but will, more probably, become more viable as consumers change their reliance on their personal transport vehicles.

    The effectiveness of ULEV’s and EV’s are (largely) misunderstood by those who presume to apply such vehicles in the context of current driving patterns and demands. For example, the regenerative energy capture capability of vehicles like the Prius – are significantly diminished if not driven in a frequent-stop-and-go regime – one of the reasons early adopters were disappointed with advertised claims.

    Similarly – I’m betting that the folks I see commuting up and down 680 in that little Smart car every day (doing 60 in the fast lane no less !) will be seriously disappointed with their purchase when this kind of high-speed wear and tear takes its toll on a vehicle never intended for this kind of use.

    The designers and marketeers of these vehicles do not have their sights set on todays daily-long-distance-commute lifestyles.

    Re “stagnant” battery technologies – here’s a good summary -

    http://media.ford.com/images/10031/Battery_Evolution.pdf

  • Bruce

    I looked at the Tesla sedan on their web site, but I’m just not going to spend $50K on any car, period. The Nissan Leaf, a CNG Honda, or maybe the upcoming CODA sedan might be more doable. There really is an operating cost advantage to EVs, both from the “fuel” and the reduced maintenance, but $50K is a pretty steep hump to get over.

  • Lights R on

    This post has been held for “moderation” since 10:46 AM this morning – let’s see if we can help move things along – -

    Re post #6 -

    The EV is likely not made “effective” by technology – but will, more probably, become more viable as consumers change their reliance on their personal transport vehicles.

    The effectiveness of ULEV’s and EV’s are (largely) misunderstood by those who presume to apply such vehicles in the context of current driving patterns and demands. For example, the regenerative energy capture capability of vehicles like the Prius – are significantly diminished if not driven in a frequent-stop-and-go regime – one of the reasons early adopters were disappointed with advertised claims.

    Similarly – I’m betting that the folks I see commuting up and down 680 in that little Smart car every day (doing 60 in the fast lane no less !) will be seriously disappointed with their purchase when this kind of high-speed wear and tear takes its toll on a vehicle never intended for this kind of use.

    The designers and marketeers of these vehicles do not have their sights set on todays daily-long-distance-commute lifestyles.

    Re “stagnant” battery technologies – here’s a good summary -

    http://media.ford.com/images/10031/Battery_Evolution.pdf

  • nuntown

    Where’s our savior BW at? LOL

  • Fremont Resident 2010

    But that $50k sedan provides almost twice the range, and you “should” be able to rent additional battery packs to up that range even farther.

    Having the range to drive to Tahoe non-stop, or to LA with one or less stops makes the Tesla a more practical car than the Leaf and some of the other EV.

    And it seats 7 (well, 4 adults and 2 kids in the “kid” seats).

  • bbox231
  • http://fcnisbacon.wordpress.com/ Marty

    After today’s market pummeling, I’m shocked the five or six vestiges of hope in the US economy aren’t up even more.

    Green shoots for the Golden State!