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Mission Boulevard Roadwork begins

Construction on Mission from I-680 all the way to the Union City/Hayward border.

State Route 238 (Mission Blvd.) Rehabilitation Project

August 12, 2010
Construction is beginning for the State Route 238 (Mission Blvd.) Rehabilitation Project. The project will rehabilitate eight miles of roadway, from Interstate 680 in Fremont to the Union City/Hayward city limit.

The majority of work will involve one-lane closures, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. This will allow the noisiest construction activities to be completed during the day, rather than at night. Two weekend closures of one lane in each direction are also planned in order to repave at the railroad undercrossing east of Stevenson Blvd. Detour information will be provided on the Caltrans District 4 website when the contractor schedules this work.

Construction activities for the eight-mile long project will include removal of failed asphalt concrete pavement, grinding existing asphalt to a desired depth, overlaying roadway with rubberized asphalt concrete, installation of loop detectors (sensors that provides traffic monitoring data, traffic signals timing), signal & lighting, and other electrical equipment, placement of a seal coat, and minor work, such as guard rails, sidewalks and curb ramps, drainage construction and pavement delineation. To reduce the impact on schools in the area, when possible, construction activities adjacent to schools will take place during the summer break.

For the latest information about the project, please visit the Caltrans District 4 website at http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist4/238mission/

Matt Artz

  • Mama bear

    oh yea, schools start next week, and so road work has to start at the same time, otherwise, how can we have disastrous traffic jams.

  • VOR

    “To reduce the impact on schools in the area, when possible, construction activities adjacent to schools will take place during the summer break.” Um, are they talking about next summer?

  • Californiaguy

    Mission Blvd, Driscol Road are all getting major upgrades.
    Peralta has been a problem for years. Thew road from Paseo to Mowry and from Paseo to Fremont Blvd. Peralta varies from a one lane to a two lane road and the road is rough full of potholes…..
    So what does the city of Fremont do, the same as always patrch, patch, patch, for over fifty years!
    The traffic on Peralta is twice that of Driscol. Fremont Politics at work.
    It is time to elect someone that represents all the people of Fremont, not just the “Good Old Boys”
    Lets rid ourselves of the self serving insiders.

  • MikeTeeVee

    Peralta is CA Route 84, so blame Caltrans for the poor condition of the road, not Fremont. The city has no jurisdiction over state routes.

  • http://fcnisbacon.wordpress.com/ Marty

    Don’t let Mike’s comment deter you, Caliguy. The council should have been lobbying Caltrans on your behalf, conducted meetings in a public venue as to not violate the Brown Act, and of course have it all done on their personal time as to not use valuable city resources exploring items that don’t garner the full support of Fremont residents, as determined by the FCN.

    I really think they dropped the ball. Vote for Vinnie!

  • californiaguy

    When the road to nowhere was approved, Union City Bart to Paseo Parkway, they promised that 84 would be taken care of. They includes the full Fremont City Council who voted for it , five ayes.
    Marty you may be happy with the status quo, but I am not
    The Fremont Mayor and the four ayes love to have excuses for not doing anything.
    A case of insiders politics

  • Gus Morrison

    Mike is right, CalTrans, essentially an independent, unelected government, has full jurisdiction of all state highways. In fact, a developer had a requirement to install a stop light at Mowry and Cherry. Caltrans had to review and approve the plans. They took a full year to approve the plan.

    As for CaliGuy, #6, when the state abandons a highway, as they would if and when the “East-West connector” is built, they have a requirement to bring the abandoned section of highway up to “a state of good repair.” On Peralta, it would require completion and upgrade of the whole section from Fremont Blvd. to Mowry. I haven’t heard much about the funding of the connector, but last I heard it was significantly short of funds.

  • MikeTeeVee

    Gus Morrison said when the state abandons a highway, as they would if and when the “East-West connector” is built, they have a requirement to bring the abandoned section of highway up to “a state of good repair.”

    That begs the question of why they haven’t been keeping it in a state of good repair in the first place. Like for the last half century or so.

  • Gus Morrison

    Mike, Read my first line. In essence, the state’s standard is much lower than the city’s.

    Over the years, I decided that, if I had a dire emergency I would want CalTrans to handle it. That is when they are at their best. If they have time to think and plan, forget it.

  • VOR

    So, if we had a major tanker truck overturn in downtown Centerville and burst into flames we stand a much better chance of CalTrans repairing it correctly.

  • http://fcnisbacon.wordpress.com/ Marty

    Don’t it VOR. It’s only a road.

  • VOR

    Yeah, there would be nothing left after the fire but a vacant lot. Wait, that’s what we have now!

  • MikeTeeVee

    Gus, it seems that Caltrans’ standards for Peralta are much lower than their standards for Mission.

    It’s not just whether the road is “complete”, it’s basic stuff like pavement quality.

    Same thing for other parts of 84 in Fremont. Have you seen the pavement quality on Thornton lately?

    Or am I reading “state of good repair” too literally?

  • Gus Morrison

    Mike, I have absolutely no idea exactly what Caltrans’ standards are. I guess they are pretty low or the common phrase wouldn’t be “bring them up to a state of good repair.”

    I do know that maintenance of state highways eats up the greatest proportion of Caltrans’ funding. Beyond that it is a mystery.