19

Skimpy Fremont News of the Day

fremont_news_linkFrom the cops:
Protesters with SEIU are picketing Park Central Care rehab facility on the 2100 block of Parkside.

Quite a few people drunk in public Tuesday night.

From me:
No more blog posts until the first week of August. I’m on vacation.

Matt Artz

  • Jon Simon

    I was expecting something about more bikini baristas.

  • West

    Matt, Have fun on your Vacation, get out of Boring Fremont, forget you work for the San Leandro Argus

  • http://fcnisbacon.wordpress.com/2010/11/03/parting-gifts-for-election-losers/ Marty

    Kudos, West. You were able to insult the city of Fremont, it’s beat reporter and the English language all in one sentence. Unparalleled.

  • West

    Damn, I did I miss Marty the Masterbaiter!!!!!

  • charlie C

    West/CalGuy…Looks like Martys harpooned himself a FCNer!!!
    http://www.masterbaitersfishing.com/aboutus

  • facee slikk
  • charlie C
  • West

    Matt,
    The “Talk Fremont” Blog is for sale…..
    The right person could make a real GO of it.

  • West

    The Fremont City Council and Mayor tried to buy the Centerville Theatre. Mr Suddig asking price was to high.
    When Mr Suddig tried to get a permit to operate the theatre, guess what?
    If Fremont cannot buy the theatre, then they will not allow Mr Suddig a permit to operate it as a theatre as it has been since 1947.
    I can smell a big lawsuit against the city of Fremont……

  • West
  • Poppie

    There is very very little public on or off street parking in old downtown Centerville.

    Events at the old mortuary (the century house) and the
    event hall on the street behind the theatre fill up their lots, the theatre lot takes what, about 10 cars?

    There were big problems in public safety and parking issues when the place called The Coffee Bean was in business, and it had to shut down, and it was a smaller venue.

    Not fair to the other businesses that need parking for their customers.

  • bbox231

    “Centerville is a symptom of problem that pervades the entire city . . . .”

    http://www.tricityvoice.com/articledisplay.php?a=6980

  • charlie C

    “There is much to be said for a development such as the A’s village concept, but this was not the brainchild of anyone on the city council.”

    …or the wrongheaded fanaticism that killed it!

    B in the box is right! Those Wannabe city council candidates that opposed the A’s village concept should now consider their opposition with the deepest regret.

  • Linda

    Charlie, Charlie, Charlie

  • charlie C

    Linda X 3=
    I prefer my oysters fried;That way I know my oysters died.

  • skumar

    With the “skimpy” headline I was hoping to hear more about the Bikini Bistro. What a disappointment.

  • bbox231

    Soo terribly disappointing when we are told over and over how little our city has in the way of resources and essential services are continuously cut but, we have no problems continuing to pour re-re-development funds into the Centerville black hole.

    The article referenced in #12 above was written more than three years ago.

    Coincidentally – just yesterday, TCV ran yet another op-ed on very much the same topic.

    Here’s an idea – let’s STOP spending money on any development ideas in Centerville. Let’s stop talking, planning, negotiating, consulting, and advising (and PAYING myriad folks to do so) . . . . because one thing I’m certain of is, our staff and council are incapable of producing ANY kind of productive result despit the many, many, many hundreds of thousands of re-re-re-development dollars spent.

    “This property has been controlled by a developer with shifting plans and empty promises for too long.”

    “Are our councilmembers simply following a path of less resistance, waiting for something to happen to and for them?”

    “there has been no action at this site and the question arises… why is this ERN continued over and over again?”

    http://www.tricityvoice.com/articlefiledisplay.php?issue=2011-07-26&file=Editorial++Do+Nothing+++TCV.txt

    New rule – - – - if you can’t execute on fundamentals like Centerville . . . don’t expect rational folks to jump on a bandwagon like an MLB stadium plan. . . .

    Demonstrate that you can reliably walk before you ask us to fund your attempts at running.

  • West

    The City Council needs to ask the residents of Fremont if they want a City Hall in Warm Springs, instead of Central Fremont.
    This is the same mistake they made in the Ball Park fiasco.
    Who in the Hell do our elected politicians represent besides Developers ??????
    There has been no discussion with the residents of Fremont about a City Hall, except the one planned for “Downtown” Fremont.
    There is a election coming up in a little more then a year from now. This will be a issue!

  • Dan Ondrasek

    Re: #9 – don’t give up:
    ”Theaters can bring people back into the cities at night and give downtown areas a new life.”

    If you are interested, a good albeit dated article about how historical theaters revitalized Connecticut cities. Some will say Apples to Oranges…
    Or is it Apples to a smaller Apple:
    http://www.nytimes.com/1987/08/09/nyregion/old-theaters-bring-downtowns-new-life.html?pagewanted=4&src=pm

    If you don’t want to read to entire article….my self-serving Cliff Notes:

    The Warner Theater (Torrington):
    ”It has proved in the last few years to be very valuable,” she said. ”It brings tourism to the city, it makes the restaurant district flourish. We get a lot of New Yorkers here on the weekends who want to go out to the show. Torrington is becoming an arts district, which is surprising because it was an industrial town.”

    Strand Theater (Seymour):
    ”Real estate agents are happy to tell clients that Seymour has live theater, and such things are important to the people who are coming here…”

    The Garde (New London)
    In New London, the Garde was vacant for several years before it was reopened in 1985. Now the home of the its own company, the American Musical Theater, the theater will play an integral part in the revitalization of downtown New London, said the group’s vice president, Daniel Morse. ”First of all, in terms of direct benefits, during our first year of operation, we brought something like 80,000 people into downtown, and at least some of those people would not have come otherwise,”

    Downside: “But such projects can also be riddled with pitfalls, as can be seen in New Haven, where the Shubert is only now rebounding from a disastrous beginning. … reopened in 1983 as the Shubert Performing Arts Center and promptly lost $1.6 million during its first year of operation”

    However – silver lining:
    ”When the city decided to restore the Shubert, that’s when outside developers knew that the city was serious about redeveloping downtown”