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GM Bob Myers Says Warriors Now Have a Plethora of Options; Who’s Greatest No. 7 Pick Ever?

Warriors general manager Bob Myers was nervous. Way more nervous than he thought he’d be. He was trying to psyche himself out with the out-of-my-control speech. But it didn’t work.

“They played the intense background music and you look around the room, you can just sense the palpable tension in there. That is hard to overcome. So my heart was beating pretty fast.”

But once he saw Toronto went No. 8, the tension was replaced with relief. That meant the Warriors were in the top seven and was going to keep their pick.

“So we’re excited.  I don’t want to overstate the excitement because just getting a pick doesn’t mean we’re going to go where we want to go. There is work to do and a lot of good options to explore.”

Myers said all options are on the table. Trade up in the draft. Use the pick as trade bait to get a veteran. Take a shot at one of the prospects they like at No. 7. Well, maybe one option isn’t on the board. To learn what that option is, and see a list of the last 32 No. 7 overall picks, you just have to keep reading.

Bob Myers Conference Call Q&A

What does this mean for the franchise?

One part of the excitement was not losing it. But it doesn’t mean it’s going to solve all our issues. We have work to do. Historically, I think we’ve done well at (No. 7) with (Chris) Mullin and (Stephen) Curry.  So hopefully we get a good player there. In addition to that, it gives us four picks for the draft, which is a really great position to be in as afar as flexibility. The things you can do with that many assets is exciting for our organization.

What were you thinking while you were up there for the first time?

“I was a lot more nervous than I thought I would be. I thought it was one of those things where you think you can convince yourself it was out of your control. But they played the intense background music and you look around the room and you can just sense the palpable tension in there. That it is hard to overcome. So my heart was beating pretty fast. But once I saw Toronto’s name come up at 8, at that point any outcome was going to be acceptable to us. Keeping this pick was certainly one of them. So we’re excited. I don’t want to overstate the excitement because just getting a pick doesn’t mean we’re going to go where we want to go. There is work to do and a lot of good options to explore.

Will you workout a lot of the top players now?

“We’ll workout anybody that will come by our facility. I think the more you can evaluate the players the better off you’ll be. Just getting a chance to get an up close and personal look at the players, talk to them, see them at your facility, put them through the drills you like to put them through. It gives an advantage. It doesn’t duplicate what you see during the year, which is 5-on-5 competition. But we’ll get in as many people as we can. I see no reason not to. Put them against each other the best you can. Hopefully they’ll come. I think they will.

Will you trade a pick?

Last year we picked three rookies. I don’t know if I’m going to pick four rookies this year. That’s seven in two years– that’s a lot of youth. If there’s a compelling reason to do that, we will. But I think we’re going to explore consolidating, looking at various trade possibilities. And that’s the nice thing about having the assets that we have going into this draft. You get in a room with guys like Jerry West, myself, our coaches, Travis Schlenk, Kirk Lacob, now we have the ability to put on the whiteboard endless possibilities as to what we can do. And that’s a good feeling instead of staring at the whiteboard and having one pick or no picks.

Is it fair to say you’ll be looking at small forwards?

It’s a strong draft in regards to (SF) and (PF) spots. So I think just by the depth at those positions and the talented players there, you’ll see a lot of those positions come through the facility and I think you will see a lot of (SFs) and (PFs) drafted high. Not just by the Warriors, but by any team in that range because there are a good amount of them. … I think that’s good because I think we need help at those positions. So it will be good to look at some of those players.

You looking for a starter or are you OK with filling out the bench at No. 7?

I think at 7 you want to get a starter. That’s the goal. When you’re picking in the top 10, you’re looking to get a starter. … I don’t think anybody’s going to be accepting the fact that we’re drafting a back-up. I think when we’re drafting that high we want to imagine that player as an eventual starter. He might not be a starter out of the gate, but you want to believe the player has an ability to start in the NBA when you’re drafting that high. And at minimum a high-level back-up. But going into it the goal is to draft a player that you feel like can start at the NBA level on a good team.

 

No. 7 overall picks since 1980

2011   Bismack Biyombo, Congo

2010    Greg Monroe, Georgetown

2009    Stephen Curry, Davidson

2008   Eric Gordon, Indiana

2007   Corey Brewer, Florida

2006    Randy Foye, Villanova

2005   Charlie Villanueva, Connecticut

2004    Luol Deng, Duke

2003    Kirk Hinrich, Kansas

2002    Nene Hilario, Brazil

2001    Eddie Griffin, Seton Hall

2000   Chris Mihm, Texas

1999   Richard Hamilton, Connecticut

1998   Jason Williams, Florida

1997    Tim Thomas, Villanova

1996    Lorenen Wright, Memphis

1995   Damon Stoudamire, Arizona

1994   Lamond Murray, Cal

1993    Bobby Hurley, Duke

1992   Walt Williams, Maryland

1991   Luc Longley, New Mexico

1990   Lionel Simmons, La Salle

1989   George McCloud, Florida State

1988   Tim Perry, Temple

1987    Kevin Johnson, Cal

1986   Roy Tarpley, Michigan

1985    Chris Mullin, St. John’s

1984    Alvin Robertson, Arkansas

1983   Thurl Bailey, North Carolina State

1982   Quintin Dailey, USF

1981    Steve Johnson, Oregon State

1980   Mike Gminski, Duke

So, who’s the greatest No. 7 pick ever? Easy answer for Warriors’ fans.

Marcus Thompson