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Outside opinions: Warriors hit the road, media still confident streak can reach new heights

The Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry (30) looks to the crowd in reaction to his brother the Sacramento Kings' Seth Curry (30) hitting 3-point shots in the second half of their NBA game at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, Nov. 28, 2015. (Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group)

The Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry (30) looks to the crowd in reaction to his brother the Sacramento Kings’ Seth Curry (30) hitting 3-point shots in the second half of their NBA game at the Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Saturday, Nov. 28, 2015. (Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group)

SALT LAKE CITY — The Warriors start a seven-game road trip on Monday at Utah, and it’s expected to be a grueling. Maybe the Jazz can threaten the streak, but no matter what happens, it’s the road trip that will be a grind. Still, the praise pours in from the writers.

  • Jack Hamilton of Slate takes a look at the dominance of the Warriors. Watching the Warriors play in 2015 is like watching some beautiful, exotic cat absentmindedly torturing a trapped bit of prey. The outcome is such a certainty that you’re there for the destruction, the tragicomic charade that the current victim has a chance. The Warriors are playing revolutionary basketball, but revolutionary in the content more than the form—it’s what they’re doing, and who’s doing it, more than how it’s being done.
  • Scott Howard-Cooper of NBA.com looks at the road trip as a test for the Warriors. The Warriors are taking 18-0 out for a spin. This is a daunting schedule. This is the kind of itinerary, complete with a couple back-to-backs and a stretch of five games in eight days to close, that can break lesser teams, let alone record winning streaks. This is Stephen Curry returning to his North Carolina home town, the next chance at history and the reunion with David Lee in Celtics green. This is no big deal.
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Warriors 120, Kings 101: Curry brothers miss another chance to hook up against one another

Stephen Curry’s brother Seth finally got to play some extended minutes against the Warriors Saturday night. The problem was, the 9 1/2 minutes he received from Sacramento Kings coach George Karl all came in the fourth quarter, by which time his bro was long gone from the game.

Steph Curry played 30 minutes in the Warriors’ 120-101 victory over the Kings, but after Golden State blew out to a 29-point lead in the third quarter, he sat for the entire fourth quarter — for the fourth consecutive game.

So the Currys are now 0 for 2 this year in their dream of playing against one another, something they’ve never done in an organized game. It was weird for Steph, because Seth came in and played well, scoring nine points by hitting all three of his 3-point attempts (he was 3 for 4 overall) and also dished a couple of assists.

“Actually, when his brother hit the first 3, I looked down to see if Steph was cheering or if he was yelling that we left him open,” said interim coach Luke Walton.

Curry mused that it must be fate that he and Seth can’t hook up one-on-one.

“I looked at Luke for a second to see if he’d put me in to guard him for a possession or two, but that was about it,” Steph said.

As for how he reacted watching Seth make his three 3-pointers, he said, “I told (Walton) the first one he made, I forgot where I was and went up with my hands to clap, like I was watching him play at Duke or something, and then I realized he was on the other team. So I had to kind of act like I was mad … but I wasn’t.

“Draymond called me out on the second 3, because I was shaking my head,” Steph continued. “He said, `Stop shaking your head, you know you’re happy.’ Which I was.”

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Outside opinions: Luke Walton might get credit after all for Warriors’ 17-0 showing

Golden State Warriors interim head coach Luke Walton walks to the bench while playing against the Chicago Bulls in the second quarter of their game at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors interim head coach Luke Walton walks to the bench while playing against the Chicago Bulls in the second quarter of their game at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Friday, Nov. 20, 2015. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

Warriors interim head coach Luke Walton is under consideration by the NBA to receive credit for the team’s record while Steve Kerr continues to be on a leave of absence. The decision could come as early as next week, but for now, the Warriors have stayed undefeated.

  • Benjamin Hoffman of the New York Times takes a look at what would happen if Walton gets the credit. Should Walton end up with the credit for the wins, he would surpass Lawrence Frank as the coach with the longest winning streak to start a career. Frank went 13-0 for the Nets when he replaced Byron Scott in the second half of the 2003-4 season. While Walton’s squad is certainly more talented than Frank’s, it is worth remembering that the Nets’ success did not last. The team was 22-20 under Scott, and after the long winning streak, it closed out the season 12-15 before being knocked out of the playoffs in the second round on the heels of consecutive N.B.A. finals appearances under Scott.
  • Bob Ryan of the Boston Globe offers his opinion on what it’s like to watch the Warriors. They are the best nightly show in all of North American sport. And, as such, should be cherished by everyone who professes to like the game of basketball. I said it of the 1985-86 Celtics, and I say it once again of the current Golden State Warriors. They render meaningless the concept of the meaningless game. Night in and night out, they are almost guaranteed to put on a scintillating show.
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Warriors 135, Suns 116: Since last season and including playoffs, Golden State is 100-20

Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr cheers on his team against the New Orleans Pelicans in the fourth quarter of their game at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2014. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr cheers on his team against the New Orleans Pelicans in the fourth quarter of their game at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2014. (Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group)

PHOENIX – The first loss in the Steve Kerr era came in Phoenix, and it was memorably frustrating.

The Warriors gave up a late lead. Kerr kicked himself for making a coaching mistake that enabled Stephen Curry to get into foul trouble. He was frustrated after Curry committed 10 turnovers and was short with his answers.

The loss was memorable in the sense that there have been so few setbacks ever since Kerr took over. The Warriors would go on to lose a second straight game last season and never did lose three straight on their way to the championship. This season, of course, they can’t be beaten even with Kerr on a leave of absence.

Golden State is 100-20, including the playoffs, since the beginning of last season when Kerr took over a good team and made it great. The Warriors got to the century mark with Kerr not on the road trip with them.

Now it’s Luke Walton who has stepped into the head chair, and like a machine, the Warriors haven’t stopped churning out wins.

They use Kerr’s system, relying on ball movement to get 3-point shots. That was on display once again at Phoenix.

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Suns coach Jeff Hornacek thinks the Warriors could have ‘great chance’ of breaking Bulls’ record

PHOENIX – Phoenix Suns coach Jeff Hornacek believes the Warriors could be the team that breaks the Chicago Bulls’ 72-win single-season record.

“The way they’re playing now, yeah,” said Hornacek, who played against the 1995-96 Bulls while with the Utah Jazz. “It’s a long season. One injury could make a big difference. They’ve been healthy last year.

“If they stay healthy, yeah they got a great chance of breaking that record.”

The Warriors are 16-0 heading into Friday’s game against the Suns.

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Outside opinions: Sweet for the Warriors to be 16-0, but will they have fewer losses than 49ers?

Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry (30) claps his hands after an easy win against the Los Angeles Lakers at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry (30) claps his hands after an easy win against the Los Angeles Lakers at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

PHOENIX — The Warriors are 16-0 heading into Friday’s against the Phoenix Suns, as Golden State continues to be the talk of the league.

  • Tim Bontemps of the Washington Post is among those impressed by the Warriors. It’s remarkable to think that Golden State has managed to play the first 20 percent of its season without suffering a loss (although they came perilously close to losing to the Brooklyn Nets in Oakland on Nov. 14, with Brook Lopez somehow missing a chip shot at the buzzer that would’ve given Brooklyn the win). That kind of start can only lead to one inevitable question: can the Warriors become the second team to win 70 games Given how Golden State is playing at the moment, it’s hard to make an argument that they won’t.
  • Kevin Arnovitz of ESPN.com considers the Warriors the most surprising team in the league. Launching a revolution usually means sustaining some casualties, but not for the Warriors. We knew they were taking league trends and perfecting them … but did we have any idea they were perfect?…The Spurs won’t catch the Warriors in the regular season, but they’re likely to be Golden State’s toughest out next spring.
  • Zach Harper of CBSSports.com looks at the odds of whether it will be the Warriors or 49ers who will have the greater number of losses this season. The bet on whether or not the Warriors will finish with more losses than the San Francisco 49ers is interesting too. The 49ers could lose as many as 13 games this season, which would mean the Warriors have to reach 69-13 in order to push on that bet if that happens. They would be just the fourth team in NBA history to win at least 69 games.
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Outside opinions: Warriors are perfect, media examines the reasons why

The Warriors are 15-0 and looking for a win against the Los Angeles Lakers on Tuesday that would give them the best start in NBA history. Beforehand, numerous articles came out that take a deeper look into the reasons why.

  • Mark Medina of the Los Angeles Daily News talks to Warriors general manager Bob Myers, who spent years in Southern California before his rise to the NBA’s executive of the year. “Cultivating a championship team was not anything I dreamed of doing,” Myers said in an interview with Los Angeles News Group. “I can only look back and see how it all occurred.”The commemorative cover of Sports Illustrated focused on Tyus Edney, the UCLA point guard hanging in the air after nailing a game-winner against Missouri in the 1995 NCAA tournament. The man who hoisted Edney was Myers, whose head was visible in the SI photograph to anyone who bothered looking.

    Nearly 20 years later, Myers called the cover a “perfect picture” for how it epitomized his life story.

    “I’m always behind the scenes and always trying to help something or someone succeed,” Myers said. “But I’m not the focal point.”

  • Sean Deveney of the Sporting News spoke with former Warriors Rick Barry, Jo Jo White and John Starks about the Warriors. Barry said that before the season tipped off, he spoke to some of the Warriors and warned them against the one thing that often unravels championship teams — personal agendas that cause players to try to force more opportunities for themselves. There has not been a trace of that problem with this group.“They’re playing like champions,” Barry said. “I was happy because what I tried to tell the guys was—I was out there for the first game—the one thing you have to watch out for is do not try to do more than you did last year. Just do the things that made you successful. Don’t try to be something you are not. If someone tries to change their role on the team, it can screw up the chemistry, and what they’ve got is working really well right now.”
  • Scott Cacciola of the New York Times talked to those in the ballet world about Stephen Curry, including Taras Domitro of the San Francisco Ballet.  Domitro, who was born in Havana, happened to arrive in the Bay Area one year before the Golden State Warriors drafted Stephen Curry. That fortunate turn of events goes a long way toward explaining how Domitro grew to enjoy watching the game.

    “What I see the most when I watch Steph is the incredible coordination he has with his arms, his legs and the way he handles the ball,” Domitro, 29, said before drawing a comparison between their respective disciplines and referring to the way male dancers support women as they execute a lift or a jump. “We don’t use a ball, you know. We use a woman. But the way he dribbles the ball is the way we handle a woman on stage.”

  • Ken Berger of CBSSports.com caught up with Warriors scout and former GM Larry Riley. “You win the title, lose your head coach, and you figure you’re going to have some down time,” Larry Riley, the Warriors’ former GM, told CBS Sports on Monday. “I’ve had 27 years in the league at various levels — assistant coach, player personnel, GM, scout, all those things — and common sense says to you, ‘This can’t happen.'”Well, it’s happening. Coming off their first NBA championship in 40 years, the Warriors haven’t lost a game that counted since June 9 — Game 3 of the Finals against the Cavaliers. They can shatter the NBA record for best start simply by beating the Lakers on Tuesday night. You look at the longest winning streaks in NBA history, look at the Warriors’ schedule, and ask yourself, when will it end?

    “We know we’re gonna get beat,” Riley said on the phone from Chandler, Ariz., where he golfs, consults with the Warriors and enjoys the sunshine and outdoors that were virtually non-existent in a three-decade life in NBA arenas.

  • Zach Lowe of ESPN.com takes a look at the small-ball revolution the Warriors have helped get going. The Warriors even surprised Mike D’Antoni, who was ahead of everyone but Don Nelson in the small-ball revolution. “Shoot,” he said, laughing, “maybe we didn’t even go small enough in Phoenix.”