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Leg injury to Warriors’ Andrew Bogut ‘wasn’t too bad,’ according to Steve Kerr

Golden State Warriors' Draymond Green (23) and Golden State Warriors' Andrew Bogut (12) guard Portland Trail Blazers' C.J. McCollum (3) as he goes up for a basket in the first quarter of Game 5 of the second round of the NBA Western Conference playoffs at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, May 11, 2016. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors’ Draymond Green (23) and Golden State Warriors’ Andrew Bogut (12) guard Portland Trail Blazers’ C.J. McCollum (3) as he goes up for a basket in the first quarter of Game 5 of the second round of the NBA Western Conference playoffs at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, May 11, 2016. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

Warriors coach Steve Kerr indicated Thursday the right adductor strain that caused center Andrew Bogut to leave Game 5 of the Western Conference semifinals was not a serious injury.

“He was pretty good today,” Kerr told KNBR after speaking with the training staff. “He came in, and the injury wasn’t too bad. He’s going to test it tomorrow. We’ll practice tomorrow morning, and it’s great to at least have four days of rest before the next game.”

Bogut suffered the leg injury in the second quarter of the Warriors’ 125-121 win against the Portland Trail Blazers and wasn’t able to return to action.

The Warriors open play in the Western Conference finals Monday against the Oklahoma City Thunder.

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Warriors’ Klay Thompson on Houston Rockets’ Jason Terry guaranteeing Game 5 win: ‘Good for him’

Golden State Warriors' Klay Thompson (11) attempts to shoot against the Dallas Mavericks in the first half of an NBA game at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson (11) attempts to shoot against the Dallas Mavericks in the first half of an NBA game at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif., on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group)

OAKLAND — Rockets reserve guard Jason Terry guaranteed his team would beat the Warriors in Game 5 on Wednesday to send the first-round series back to Houston.

“We believe we can get a win here tomorrow, and that’s going to be a long flight for them to come back home to Houston,” Terry told reporters Tuesday at Oracle Arena.

“I’m guaranteeing it. I mean, if I don’t, then what? It’s a loss, right? So I guarantee a victory because that’s what it’s going to take. I know we can get a win here and this thing back home to Houston.”

The Warriors will play without Stephen Curry, who is out indefinitely due to a sprained right knee.

Asked about Terry’s comments, Warriors guard Klay Thompson said, “Good for him.”

“I don’t care,” Warriors center Andrew Bogut said. “I mean, we’ll see what happens. I guess he’s trying to rally the troops or whatever he’s trying to do.”

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Warriors’ Andrew Bogut expects Harrison Barnes, Marreese Speights will get ‘a lot of money’ in free agency

Golden State Warriors' Harrison Barnes (40) shoots and makes a 3-point basket against the Cleveland Cavaliers in the second quarter of Game 6 of the NBA Finals at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, on Tuesday, June 16, 2015. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors’ Harrison Barnes (40) shoots and makes a 3-point basket against the Cleveland Cavaliers in the second quarter of Game 6 of the NBA Finals at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, on Tuesday, June 16, 2015. (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group)

OAKLAND – Warriors center Andrew Bogut expects that his teammates in contract years will ultimately be rewarded for the season the team is having.

That includes Harrison Barnes, who is averaging a career-best 11.3 points per game, yet has seen his field goal percentages drop from last season. Barnes, who missed 16 games due to a sprained ankle, will become a restricted free agent this offseason after reportedly rejecting a four-year, $64 million offer from the Warriors before the season.

“We’re winning,” Bogut said Tuesday when asked about Barnes. “A lot of guys are sacrificing numbers and minutes and roles on this team, and that’s why we’re a great team. Harrison’s had great games, he’s had bad games just like everybody else on this roster. So I don’t anticipate it affecting his contract situation and all that. I mean, someone’s going to be giving him the max. Let’s be honest. Someone’s going to give him close to the max. There’s always a small-market team that would love a guy like Harrison as their No. 1, No. 2 option. So I don’t think it’s going to have any bearing on his financial future.”

Bogut also highlighted the contributions of Marreese Speights, who in the final year of a three-year, $11 million deal after a slow start has emerged into a 3-point shooting threat and played well after Festus Ezeli underwent knee surgery.

Ezeli last week conceded that it wasn’t an “ideal” contract year for him missing an extended of period of time.

But Bogut believes that the Warriors on this team will be paid handsomely.

“I think people know that everyone on this team is more valuable than their contract says just from the basis of what they’ve given up,” Bogut said. “You look at a guy like (Andre) Iguodala and even Mo Speights right now, Festus, all these guys probably could make more on other teams.

“Mo’s been absolutely huge for us this season, and someone’s obviously going to give him a lot of money. Hopefully, it’s us.”

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Andrew Bogut: Critics of Warriors’ screens are just trying to take away from success of Stephen Curry and the team

Golden State Warriors' Andrew Bogut, center, high-fives the fans at Oracle Arena after the team's record-setting 67th win, in an NBA basketball game against the Denver Nuggets, Wednesday, April 15, 2015, at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif. The Warriors won, 133-126. (D. Ross Cameron/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors’ Andrew Bogut, center, high-fives the fans at Oracle Arena after the team’s record-setting 67th win, in an NBA basketball game against the Denver Nuggets, Wednesday, April 15, 2015, at Oracle Arena in Oakland, Calif. The Warriors won, 133-126. (D. Ross Cameron/Bay Area News Group)

OAKLAND – Andrew Bogut has heard the complaints aboutscreens the Warriors set, and the big man explains what he believes to be the reasons for the heightened awareness.

“People are just trying to take away the season we’re having No. 1 and the season Steph (Curry’s) having,” Bogut said Monday. “They’re looking for any excuse. ‘Oh, Steph wouldn’t get those shots in the ‘80s.’ Or ‘Steph wouldn’t get those shots in the 90s.’ Or ‘blah blah blah blah blah.’ They’re all straw man arguments that are pointless.

“Do we set hard screens? Yeah, we put pressure on the officials. They call us for moving screens. I’ve been called for many moving screens. Then we adjust. But every smart team in the league knows…I wouldn’t say we’re going out there moving. We’re going out and setting hard screens, and you figure out how the referees are going to officiate the game. I mean, if you have Steph Curry on your team, would you not try to knock his man on his (behind) as much as you can to get him wide-open threes? Everyone in the league would say ‘yes.’ I mean, people starting all this stuff, I think it’s just because of the success we’ve had.”

The Warriors took criticism for moving screens after Draymond Green set this pick Feb. 24 to free up Curry to hit the go-ahead 3-pointer at Miami. The following day, the NBA confirmed that the no-call was correct because Green “gives (Luol Deng) room to avoid the contact.”

Green two days later tweeted Bogut, “Tell Big Jimmy you and I have illegal screens for days to allow Steph to get his shot off!”

Bogut had screens on his mind the day after that and had some fun with it before turning serious about how the criticism is Curry-related.

“Yeah, I mean teams set a lot of moving screens against us,” Bogut said. “It’s hard to step around the moving screens and Klay (Thompson) constantly gets nailed. We’re hoping that the league sees that there’s some moving screens against us every game. Does that answer your question?

“Oh we have moving (screens). I’m not sure. I mean, I don’t see it out there. I’m always setting textbook screens. Draymond as well. Look, there’s physical screens being set out there. Is every shot Steph’s making coming off a ball screen? No. Or coming off a pindown? No. Guys are trying to take away from the fact that he dribbles up a step over halfcourt and launches and makes a three. We’re not setting any screens. So I think it’s disrespectful in a way to say that more on Steph’s part because people make it out like, ‘Oh, if they didn’t get him open with those screens, he wouldn’t be scoring what he’s scoring. He’s still going to score what he’s going to score regardless of whether there are screens for him or not. He’s that good of a player.”

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Warriors’ Andrew Bogut on dirty player labels, Damian Lillard, double standard for international players

Golden State Warriors center Andrew Bogut (12) passes the ball past the Detroit Pistons Aron Baynes (12) during the fourth quarter of their game on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Oakland, Calif. The Warriors defeated the Pistons 109 to 95. (Aric Crabb/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors center Andrew Bogut (12) passes the ball past the Detroit Pistons Aron Baynes (12) during the fourth quarter of their game on Monday, Nov. 9, 2015 in Oakland, Calif. The Warriors defeated the Pistons 109 to 95. (Aric Crabb/Bay Area News Group)

OAKLAND – Warriors center Andrew Bogut explained his cryptic tweet about the play that left teammate Andre Iguodala injured by asking a question.

“What do you think if a different guy did that like a (Matthew) Dellavedova?” Bogut asked about his Australian countryman and friend who played college basketball at Saint Mary’s.

Both Bogut and Dellavedova have been labeled “dirty” players in the past and most recently in January when a Los Angeles Times poll of 24 anonymous coaches, assistants and players gave the two multiple votes for being among the dirtiest.

Bogut isn’t so much bothered by Portland Trail Blazers star Damian Lillard for the play on which Iguodala sprained his left ankle as he is by the double standard that he sees.

“It seems like certain guys – predominantly international – that are the dirty guys in the league,” Bogut said. “That would have been a national outrage if it was somebody else. It goes back to I don’t think Damian did it on purpose. I don’t think he did it on purpose. I don’t think he tried to hurt Andre. But the be-all end-all, it’s a reckless play. No matter how you look at it. I don’t think he tried to hurt him, but at the same time, you dove for a loose ball through someone’s legs. That’s what happens, and that’s just unfortunate, but like I said, they’d be calling for his head (if it was somebody else).

“There’s a huge double standard, a massive double standard. And I’m not saying Damian should get in trouble. Nothing like that…It’s more like the perception afterwards of the double standard. Like if it’s a big 7-foot international guy, all of a sudden, ‘Oh yeah, he’s not as skilled or talented.’ An All-Star does it, ‘You know, he was just hustling.’ Which is a disappointing thing.”

Dellavedova, Steven Adams from New Zealand, Bogut, Matt Barnes, and the Congolese-Spanish player Serge Ibaka received the most votes for dirtiest players in the Los Angeles Times poll.

Bogut pointed out that while he has been labeled dirty, he has never injured another player – unlike what happened Friday when Lillard got tangled up with Iguodala in the third quarter as the Warriors led 106-83.

“People straight-away say that I’m dirty,” Bogut said. “I’ve never put a guy out. I’ve screened guys hard. I’ve hard-fouled guys. I’ve never put a guy out.

“People, they’re going crazy at me because I’m supposed to be a dirty player, and it’s like, that’s fine. But if you check in my 11-year career, I’ve never fouled somebody or been physical with somebody, and they’ve missed the next game or been injured. Period.”

Bogut said he doesn’t actually care that he is seen by some as dirty.

“At the end of the day, I’m not going to go and eat dinner with guys I’m playing against,” Bogut said. “I’m not going to be friends with them. When I’m not playing basketball, I’m not going to be there while in Australia. So I really don’t care. If they hate playing against me, that’s a good thing. But I’m not going out there trying to hurt people. I am going out there to try and nail guys on screens to get my teammates open. A hundred percent. You can quote me on that. I am going to be physical and throw my weight around and take the hard fouls. That’s what is expected from me.

“I’ve never taken anyone’s legs out. Go back on record and have a look.”

As for Lillard, Bogut might have tweeted that the play was reckless. But he didn’t mean that he thought the Oakland native was trying to hurt Iguodala.

“There’s no way I said he did it on purpose,” Bogut said. “I think it was a basketball play. Was it a silly play? Yes.

“But these things happen in the game. But at the same time, if one guy did it on the same play compared to someone else, what’s the difference? That’s just the annoying thing. But that comes with status and all that kind of stuff. So it’s just really frustrating. You read between the lines and see who a lot of guys say the dirty guys are. It’s generally always international guys.”

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Warriors’ Andrew Bogut to come off the bench against Detroit Pistons

bogut

OAKLAND — Warriors center Andrew Bogut will come off the bench against the Detroit Pistons on Monday after missing six games due to a concussion, according to interim head coach Luke Walton.

Festus Ezeli will start until Bogut can get back into game shape after having completed the NBA’s return-to-participation protocol.

Bogut has not yet practiced fully since suffering the concussion during the season opener. He also missed three preseason games due to a broken nose. He did not need to be tested for a concussion after taking that blow to the head, according to the Warriors.

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Warriors’ Andrew Bogut explains why he had championship ring placed on middle finger

Golden State Warriors' Klay Thompson (11) celebrates with the NBA championship trophy with teammates and owners Peter Gruber and Joe Lacob after the Golden State Warriors 105-97 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 6 of the NBA Finals to win the NBA Championship at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, on Tuesday, June 16, 2015. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)

Golden State Warriors’ Klay Thompson (11) celebrates with the NBA championship trophy with teammates and owners Peter Guber and Joe Lacob after the Golden State Warriors 105-97 win over the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game 6 of the NBA Finals to win the NBA Championship at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio, on Tuesday, June 16, 2015. (Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group)

Warriors center Andrew Bogut explained Wednesday why he had his championship ring placed on his right middle finger by CEO Joe Lacob during pre-game festivities the previous night.

“Oh, I just follow the Australian way, mate,” Bogut told 1116 SEN in Melbourne. “That’s the finger that Australians wear the ring on. It’s pretty easy to trick people over here with that. They kind of believed it.”

Bogut had mentioned the ring on the middle finger last month when Warriors broadcaster Bob Fitzgerald asked on KNBR about the mindset of the team given the criticism it took from other NBA teams after the championship.

“I’ve actually got my ring fitted for my middle finger so they can kiss that one,” Bogut said.

Former teammate David Lee smiled and told reporters about Bogut having his ring fitted for the middle finger, “Oh, will you stop, Bogut? I love Andrew for that reason. I think I actually saw him put in on his middle finger. That’s a guy that actually would do that, and I’m not surprised at that whatsoever. He’s a great guy.”

Lee clarified he would have his ring on his ring finger.