0

Berkeley: Vintage views of Adeline Street as a major streetcar corridor

adeline woolsey 1949124
A shop on Adeline in 1949.

3200 block Adeline train auto 1952 (2)
The 3200 block of Adeline Street in Berkeley looking toward Oakland in 1952.

The annual Juneteenth Festival in Berkeley returns from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. June 19 on a five-block stretch of the Alcatraz-Adeline corridor south of Ashby Avenue that will be closed to motor traffic.
Adeline has seen a lot of changes since Key System streetcar tracks ran down the middle of the street, the reason it remains so wide today.

More changes are in the works. Berkeley is holding workshops and discussions about its Adeline Corridor plan, so we thought it would be interesting to offer some views of Adeline as it looked in the years after World War II for comparison of what it was, what it is now and what the city and community envision for the thoroughfare.

Berkeley lists these as the goals for its Adeline Corridor Plan:

Objectives of the planning process include:

Identifying community goals, including but not limited to, affordable housing, local jobs, historic preservation, and an arts district
Identifying priorities for physical improvements, such as a cohesive streetscape design, public art, pedestrian safety, improved connectivity and increased accessibility, and “complete” streets
Identifying opportunity sites to help achieve these community goals
Better positioning the City to receive funding for physical improvements along the Corridor

Our friend and railroad expert John Stashik notes that in two of the photos, the portion of “double track with switch into single track were used by Key System trains of the F line from 1941 to 1958. The rail geographically west of Key’s tracks was used as a freight lead for Southern Pacific to access customers at Ward Street. Originally a double track line for the Red Trains until 1941.”

adeline woolsey 1949134

Adeline Street at Woolsey in 1949.

adeline woolsey 1949128
Adeline Street at Woolsey looking toward downtown Berkeley in 1949.

adeline woolsey 1949125
Another view of Adeline Street at Woolsey in 1949.

adeline woolsey 1949135

adeline woolsey 1949129

0

Thursday will mark one year since deadly Berkeley balcony collapse

balcony memorial

A small memorial has been placed on the sidewalk outside Library Gardens on Kittredge Street in Berkeley.
Thursday will mark one year since six students died in #Berkeley balcony collapse. Five were Irish; one Irish-American and tributes to them have been held in Dublin, Ireland on the anniversary, reports Irish news website www.breakingnews.ie.

The Irish Immigration Patoral Center in San Francisco announced that a mass will be held at 7 p.m. June 15 in Oakland:

On behalf of the Irish Immigration Pastoral Center, the Consulate General of Ireland and St. Columba’s Church, we invite you to join us to celebrate a First Anniversary Mass for Olivia Burke, Eoghan Culligan, Ashley Donohoe, Lorcán Miller, Niccolai Schuster and Eimear Walsh who lost their lives in Berkeley on June 16, 2015.

The First Anniversary Mass will be celebrated on this Wednesday, June 15, at 7.00 p.m. in St. Columba’s Church (6401 San Pablo Avenue, Oakland).
We invite all of our community to remember those who died and also to pray for the continued recovery of those injured – Aoife Beary, Clodagh Cogley, Sean Fahey, Conor Flynn, Jack Halpin, Niall Murray and Hannah Waters.
Mass will be followed by a Community Reception in the Parish Hall.
To assist us with planning for the reception, please RSVP to admin@sfiipc.org if you plan to join us.

balcony2

balcony3

0

1946 views of Golden Gate district for Love Our Neighborhood Day in Oakland and Berkeley

san pablo ave looking west 1946
San Pablo Avenue looking toward downtown Oakland in 1946, with the Gateway Theatre on the left. The Oakland Tribune tower is visible in the distance

In honor of the second Love Our Neighborhood Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 4 along a stretch of San Pablo Avenue in Oakland and Berkeley, here are some vintage views of the Golden Gate neighborhood in Oakland.
One of the events during Love Our Neighborhood Day will be a walking tour of the Golden Gate and Paradise Park neighborhoods led by author and historian Gene Anderson.
The walk will set out at 11 a.m. from the southeast corner of 59th Street and San Pablo, and last about two hours.
San Pablo Avenue will be closed to motor traffic from Stanford Avenue in Oakland to Ashby Avenue in Berkeley for the street party.

san pablo ave looking west 1946 gateway theatre
Detail showing the Gateway Theatre on San Pablo near Stanford. The building is now a church.

oakland san pablo ave 1946 trader vic
San Pablo Avenue at 65th Street in 1946, showing Trader Vic’s in its original location, left, and Walt’s Trading Post on the right.

2

Eastshore Highway, ancestor of Interstate 80, officially dedicated in El Cerrito 79 years ago this week

eastshore dedication 05 26 1937

The granddaddy of the Bay Area freeway system was dedicated 79 years ago this week at a ceremony at San Pablo Avenue and Hill Street in El Cerrito on May 27, 1936. The Eastshore was the first newly built highway in the Bay Area, constructed to handle traffic heading to the new Bay Bridge and Oakland and relieve the increasing volume on San Pablo Avenue. At the time it was dedicated it was described as “one of the most modern and finest stretches of roadway in California.”
Modern or not, the highway saw continual upgrades almost from the time it was completed. The highway was expanded from two lanes to three in each direction and in 1940 stoplights were added at the entrances on Ashby and University avenues in Berkeley.
Then as now, officials in Berkeley were hard-pressed to figure out how to handle the complex interchange at Gilman Street.
In 1942 a second roadway branching off at Albany and originally dubbed the Shipyard Highway, was created using more Bay fill to handle the volume of traffic from defense workers going to the Kaiser shipyards in Richmond. That roadway is now a portion of Interstate 580 and connects to the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge.
The Eastshore Highway became the Eastshore Freeway in the 1950s, expanded and extended through West Contra Costa to the Carquinez Bridge. Today the successor to the cornerstone of the Bay Area freeway system is 10 lanes wide, with dedicated carpool lanes, yet it consistently ranks at or near the top of the most congested freeways in the Bay Area.

Eastshore Highway under construction in 1934.
Original caption: “S. F.. BRIDGES.. S. F. OAKLAND; E. B. FILL LEADING TOWARD BERKELEY” from the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection

Eastshore Highway April 1936.
Original caption: “This aerial view looking north toward Berkeley from the Distribution Structure of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge shows the Berkeley Fill which will be completed in time for the opening of the great bridge to automobile traffic early in November. Highway engineers under the direction of C. H. Purcell, Chief Engineer of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and State Highway Engineer, are designing this approach to be one of the finest and safest arterials in California.” From the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection

eastshore hwy const contract 06 1936
With the Bay fill in place the contracts to build the actual highway were awarded in June of 1936.

eastshore highway crack 08 1936
Contractors ran into trouble in August of 1936 when a portion of the fill collapsed.

eastshore highway berkeley 1936
Berkeley took advantage of the newly enclosed area to the east of the highway by creating Aquatic Park in 1936.

aquatic park construction berkeley 1935
Workers construct Aquatic Park in Berkeley in 1935.

eastshore hwy gilman pave 10 1936
Berkeley also extended Gilman Street to the highway, awarding a paving contract in October 1936 to provide another entrance.

Eastshore Highway 1938.
Original caption: “Division of the Eastshore Highway approach to the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge with a medial strip was the Bay Region’s most important recent contribution toward the cause of accident prevention, in the opinion of traffic experts. The result has been a minimum of collisions on one of the most heavily traveled thoroughfares in Northern California.”
From the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection

eastshore highway pierce street 1940
The portion of the Eastshore Highway north of University Avenue took longer to construct because it ran inland from the Bay and had to cross railroad tracks, which required construction of a bridge by Albany Hill and digging through hills in the Richmond Annex. Above is the elevated roadway at Albany Hill, along with Albany’s original entrance to the highway at Pierce Street.

eastshore highway pierce st albany 1937
Albany quickly found out that there were problems with the entrance at Pierce Street, including visibility, the volume of traffic and cars driving the wrong direction on the one-way route to the on-ramp.

eastshore highway first crash trib 07 1837
The first crash on the new portion of the highway was recorded in July of 1937.

eastshore 09 1937
This September 1937 aerial view from the Oakland Tribune shows the original route of the highway.

2

Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders makes a meal stop on Solano Avenue in Albany

Bernie1
A patron took these photos of presidential candidate Bernie Sanders at China Village Restaurant on Solano Avenue in Albany.

After a long day of campaigning in the Bay Area on Wednesday, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and his entourage — including Secret Service agents — stopped for a late night meal at China Village on Solano Avenue. The unannounced appearance quickly drew a crowd of onlookers taking in the scene from outside the restaurant.
“It was worth the wait,” said a woman who was there when Sanders came out of the restaurant after he was done feeling the burn of the Szechuan cuisine. “He was great. He shook hands with everyone.”
Small groups were still outside the restaurant, closed by then, after Sanders departed.

IMG_5224

20160518_215134_1

IMG_5225


Adoring crowd on Solano Avenue chants for @BernieSanders Wednesday

0

New Bay Trail link for bicycle commuters to be dedicated in Emeryville

IMG_2678
City of Emeryville

A ribbon-cutting on a Bay Trail link will be held at the northwest corner of Christie Avenue and Shellmound Street in Emeryville at 9:30 a.m. May 12, which is Bike to Work Day. The new section “connects southbound cyclists from Emeryville, Berkeley and Richmond to the Bay Bridge Bicycle and Pedestrian Pathway and the Mandela Parkway, and connects northbound cyclists from Oakland and beyond to the Emeryville and Berkeley Marinas, and shorelines up to and through Richmond.”

“The Emeryville Connection” Ribbon Cutting will dedicate “the opening of the new cycle track section of the Bay Trail, from Powell Street to Shellmound Street on the north edge of Christie Avenue, along with Emeryville’s second dedicated bicycle turn signal at Shellmound Street and Christie Avenue.”

A Bike to Work energizer station will be at that location from 7 to 9 a.m. that morning.

0

Berkeley District 3 council candidate Mark Coplan outlines his platform

Mark Coplan, retired spokesman for the Berkeley Unified School District and candidate for the District 3 City Council seat, has issued the following statement about his candidacy:

Berkeley Residents: My Platform for Your Review and Consideration

Dear Editor and Berkeley Voice Readers,
I was first asked to consider running for the Council by retired teacher and neighbor Ann Einstein whose endorsement reads, “You don’t have to be an Einstein to know that Mark Coplan is good for our community. You just have to know him.” I would love to have your endorsement as well, and endorsements from friends, neighbors and community leaders are as important to me as those of elected officials and other organizations usually considered critical to a successful campaign, maybe more.

I do not plan to run a traditional campaign, and in fact I am committed to not adding to the offensive stack of junk mail that will flood your recycling bin, and my volunteers and I will be knocking on your door with green-friendly literature to personally ask for your vote instead. I intend to serve District 3 residents diligently, but I’m reaching out to all Berkeley residents as I intend for my service to positively impact all of our fine city.

I am not a career politician, but I have spent my adult life in public service, and what I have to offer is very clear – Service and Commitment. As the Public Information Officer for the Berkeley Unified School District, my energy and passion has helped me to better serve parents and staff, who have always asked, “How can you be everywhere?” Deeply committed to my community, I will bring that energy to District 3 and will commit full time as a Councilperson. I have a reputation of working effectively with all sides of the issues, with a keen ability to listen to all viewpoints and identify mutual ground and consensus. I can work with people to collectively define and implement our best ideas – and I have a reputation for being trustworthy. I will state my positions clearly and vote decisively, insuring that my constituents always know exactly where I stand.

My 20 years of serving BUSD, as a very active parent and in the administration, have given me a solid, strong understanding of protocols, public process, transparency, and a foundation for a window into the workings of city government. I’m just beginning to look more closely at some of our city issues, and I’m seeing some practical solutions that I will be drafting up to share. Furthermore, I have established professional relationships with most of our elected officials, from the local, county, to the state level, their staff, and with City of Berkeley administrators and staff.

I am sensitive to the unique issues of south Berkeley, such as racism, shootings, police relations and the impact of gentrification and redistricting which have transformed District 3’s composition. We have people of all colors, conservative and progressive pockets of young and older families, hipsters, and university students. I will visit our District 3 businesses monthly and hold regular community meetings, and listen to my District’s concerns. I intend to adopt all of the schools in District 3 and participate in their school communities, and I’ll encourage the rest of the Council to do the same (Full disclosure – Daryl Moore did it first).

I have earned community respect on all levels, and I am known for respecting everyone, including those I may disagree with. I will not allow discord with fellow councilmembers to impact my desire to find equitable solutions or mar my positive attitude. Although I may debate passionately for my neighbors, I will not disparage or attack anyone with differing views, in public or in private.
I encourage you to contact me directly with your questions and your support at markcoplan.district3@gmail.com.

Sincerely,
Mark Coplan, City Council Candidate for District 3

Mark Coplan Dec 2015 01

0

Richmond: Plan for airport at Point Isabel never got off the ground 50 years ago


Before the Point Isabel proposal, an airport was proposed off of Berkeley in 1945. (San Francisco Public Library History Center)

point isabel airport 10 1966a

If a plan first raised in 1966 had flown with regulators, there might have been an airport for small aircraft along the Bay in Richmond where dogs now frolic, strollers and bicyclists take in Bay views and UC Berkeley is planning its global campus.
The proposal for the Point Isabel airport between Point Isabel and Brooks Island surfaced in the summer of 1966 and was largely embraced by business leaders in Richmond as beneficial to local commerce and the region as a whole. Had the proposal been made 10 years earlier, it might have flown. But plans to fill 225 acres of mudflats now had to go before the Bay Conservation and Development Commission, the regulatory panel established in 1965 as a result of the activism of the the Save San Francisco Bay Association (later Save the Bay).
The airport proposal was exactly the type of project Save the Bay tried to halt, but it wasn’t for lack of trying by the idea’s promoters.
The City Councils in Albany, Berkeley and El Cerrito all went on record in opposition, with Kay Kerr, one of the three founders of Save the Bay and the wife of UC Berkeley President Clark Kerr, speaking against the project before the El Cerrito council.

point isabel airport 10 1966

The plan did get as far as being submitted to the BCDC for consideration, but discussion was postponed a few times and the notion ultimately ran out of steam.

On Nov. 16 the Oakland Tribune reported that Berkeley had officially stated its opposition to the project:

OPPOSE AIRPORT
The council also went on record as opposing the proposed Richmond Airport in the bay between Point Isabel and Brooks Island. The project, which is to come before the Bay Conservation and Development Commission on Friday, would require
filling 225 acres in two stages.
The council opposed the project because it would create a noise problem and commit a major portion of the Eastbay shoreline before a regional plan could be drawn up. Councilmen also noted that regional plans call for inland rather than bay airports.

On Nov. 19 the Tribune reported that “BCDC took no action at this time on a request by the city of Richmond for an ‘advisory opinion’ on a proposed airport construction at Point Isabel which would involve filling 225 acres of tidelands. The project would serve small planes.”

A man readies to throw a ball for his dog to fetch while enjoying the sunset at Point Isabel Regional Shoreline in Richmond, Calif. on Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011.  (Dean Coppola/Staff)

A man readies to throw a ball for his dog to fetch while enjoying the sunset at Point Isabel Regional Shoreline in Richmond, Calif. on Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011. (Dean Coppola/Staff)

0

Jewel Lake in Tilden Park replenished by recent rains

jewel lake 12 2015 by Marta Yamamoto

Jewel Lake in Tilden Regional Park in the Berkeley hills is ” is back and lovely as always,” reports our correspondent Marta Yamamoto, who took the photo above. As she reported in September, the prolonged drought had reduced the lake, popular with park visitors and wildlife alike, to what many were referring to as “Jewel Puddle.”
As that story noted, the lake “originated as a reservoir known as Wildcat Creek Diversion Dam, finished around 1921, when water reached East Bay cities via its concrete aqueduct.”

VOI-JEWELLAKE-0904
Jewel Lake as it looked in its dried out state in September. Staff photo by Kristopher Skinner.