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Albany activists planning local Women’s March on Saturday

albnay march

Plans have been announced via social media for Women’s March Albany from 8 to 10 a.m. Jan. 21, starting at Ocean View Elementary, 1000 Jackson St. in Albany.

 

ALL are welcome to march to show support for the rights of women, children, men, minorities, the LGBTQ community, immigrants and undocumented people, the environment, and anyone else who may feel threatened by our new administration.

Think globally, act locally.
Start off your day of demonstration close to home in Albany. We’ll walk from Ocean View Elementary School at 1000 Jackson St. to the Memorial Torch at the corner of Solano and Key Route. We’ll start early — 8:00 am — so you will be able to join other marches in the Bay Area, if you would like to.

Wear Pink (for Women’s Rights) or Purple (for anti-bullying) or Rainbows (for LGBTQ rights) and a Pussy Hat!

Let Your Voice Be Heard

Feel free to make signs that express your beliefs. Please be aware that we would like this to be welcoming to all families (so maybe limit the profanity . . . ). Meet at 7:30 am to make signs. Bring posterboard, pens, etc.

We are looking forward to gathering together as a community to support each other in the spirit of love, acceptance, and hope.

EVERYONE is invited, including people of all ages, all genders, all sexual preferences, all races, all religions, and all political viewpoints. Please feel free to invite local friends!

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Richmond: High school student’s Christmas light show worth a visit (video)

 

RICHMOND — One of the most impressive Christmas displays you’ll see this season requires a trip to Nome — not the Alaskan city, but Nome Street, a small dead-end street in East Richmond Heights. That’s where Armando Epifani, a 17-year-old high school student, has an elaborate display that sychronizes lights and other effects — including water spouts and flame — to music.

The professionally done “Lights on Nome” production is all the doing of the young man, his father said, adding, “All I do is pay for the electricity.”

As the video below shows, the display incorporates elements of a nighttime show at Disneyland and maybe the fountains outside the Bellagio casino in Las Vegas.

Watch for yourself and consider making the trip to see it in person. Even though Christmas is over, the display continues through Jan. 6 and is in action on the hour from 5 p.m. to midnight.

 

nome street map

 

lights on nome1

 

 

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Similar scenario to 1991 Oakland firestorm played out in 1913

claremont hotel 1920s

An October fire fanned by high winds and fueled by abundant eucalyptus trees and tall grass sweeps through the Oakland-Berkeley hills and threatens the landmark Claremont Hotel. That describes the events of the disaster known as the Oakland Firestorm of Oct. 19, 1991 that is coming up on its 25th anniversary.

It also sums up a fire that broke out on Oct. 6, 1913 in the Berkeley hills that overwhelmed the young city’s firefighting capability. The Claremont residential district in Berkeley had been established for less than a decade and was still developing. The hotel itself had been under construction for a number of years, stalled at points by financial issues.

“Following an architectural competition, ground was broken in 1906 for the Claremont
Hotel, designed by Charles W. Dickey,” the Berkeley Architectural Heritage Association writes on its website. “It was not only to be a glorious destination site, seen from all vistas around the Bay, but it was also to be a large garden park enhancing the environment for the building of beautiful homes.”

According to Historic Hotels of America, “construction was held up — first by the earthquake of 1906 and then subsequently, the Panic of 1907.”

The fire was reported by a resident around noon, the San Francisco Call reported, and Berkeley soon had to seek assistance from Oakland in battling the blaze. (Berkeley’s department had been a full-tme professional company for less than a decade, formed in 1904 after City Hall burned down.) Also assisting were “hundreds of residents.”
claremont hotel fire 10 6 1913
Coverage from the San Francisco Call
of the Oct. 6, 1913 fire that swept
through the hills, a scenario similar
to what happened on Oct. 19, 1991.

The blaze threatened not only the hotel, described by the Call as “one of the largest framed hostelries of the west,” but homes in the fashionable Claremont neighborhood. The fire did not claim the hotel, but did spread unchecked along Tunnel Road through the largely unpopulated hills, “fanned by a high wind” and burning down “trees set out by the People’s Water Company (a forerunner of EBMUD) five years ago.”

The fire burned several hundred acres in the hills, according to the Call account, but no property damage or injuries were reported other than the loss of the trees.

The hills would be much more developed by the time of the 1991 firestorm that claimed 25 lives and destroyed 3,642 homes, with damages estimated at $1.68 billion. Some claimed at the time that resources were diverted to from fighting that fire to prevent its spreading to the Claremont Hotel. Others say that if the fire had reached the Claremont, it would have more easily spread into lower Berkeley and possibly reached the UC Berkeley campus.

The Claremont finally did open in May of 1915, in time to serve tourists to the Panama Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco.

claremont opening 05 03 1915