Richmond: Salesian College Preparatory celebrates Native American Heritage Day


The students, faculty and staff of Salesian College Preparatory gather in the school’s gym to honor the Native American. This Heritage Day celebration brought together representatives from 8 tribes. Special activities included Fancy Shawl dancing by Lakota Holder (Lakota, Tlingit, Navajo), drumming by Michael Bellanger (Sac and Fox/Kickapoo), storytelling by Jessie Riddle (Pit River/Apache), corn husk doll-making by Diane Dierking and a special guest, Tommie Postoak, from the The Chickasaw Nation in Oklahoma. Also, Richmond resident Michael “Raccoon Eyes” Kinney (Cherokee) offered a beautiful Cherokee prayer song. The governor of The Chickasaw Nation, Bill Annouatubby, sent a flag to the school in support of this event.
“It’s important that we keep the Native American spirit alive and thriving,” said Salesian senior and event organizer Ellissa Thompson, an enrolled member in the Chickasaw Nation. “By doing so we help preserve this vital culture and help others understand the richness and vitality of the Native American way of life. With November designated as Native American Heritage Month, it was important that the culture be brought to life, and not brushed off as another notation on a calendar.” Governor Bill Anoatubby of the Chickasaw Nation sent a Chickasaw flag and a letter of support in recognition of the event. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)


Fancy Shawl dancer Lakota Holder mesmerized the audience as she demonstrated various kinds of powwow dances. Michael Bellanger, Bay Area drum teacher and singer, accompanied Holder while she danced, beating traditional powwow music. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

Jessie Riddle regales the audience with her vibrant Native American tales. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

Tommie Postoak from the Department of Culture and Humanities flew out from Oklahoma to share the rich culture of the Chickasaw Nation. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

Michael “Raccoon Eyes” Kinney ended the assembly with a Cherokee blessing song. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

The performers pose together after the sharing of Native American culture (left to right: Michael “Raccoon Eyes” Kinney, Jessie Riddle, Carol Thompson, Tommie Postoak, Ellissa Thompson, and Lakota Holder). Both Carol and Ellissa Thompson wear “traditional regalia” from the Chickasaw Nation, including beaded tribal collars and dresses that were adopted by the tribe just after the era of Indian removal in 1837. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

Ellissa Thompson and student helpers serve traditional Chickasaw “pashofa” (cooked cracked corn, a staple of the Chickasaw tribe for thousands of years) and fry bread tacos for lunch. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

Diane Dierking (Pit River/Apache) sets up a table to teach students how to make corn husk dolls. Although commonly referred to as “Pioneer dolls”, this type of doll was first made by Indians and then shared with the settlers. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

One of the many student-recreated pieces of artwork that were on display throughout the hallways. This piece is representative of the Tlingit tribe. (Native American Heritage Day, Nov. 6, 2015 at Salesian College Preparatory, Richmond, CA)

Photos and text courtesy of Carol Thompson and Salesian College Preparatory.


1978 article shows El Cerrito’s Sundar Shadi in his floral element

shadi gazette 1978

Above, the Berkeley Gazette/Richmond Independent looks at Sundar Shadi’s floral displays on his hillside property on Arlington Avenue in early June of 1978.

A free showing of the documentary on the life of Sundar Shadi will be held Saturday at the Rialto Cinemas Cerrito in El Cerrito.
The organizers of the annual Sundar Shadi holiday display need volunteers to help staff and watch over the display on Moeser Lane at Sea View Drive from Dec. 12 to 26.


El Cerrito High School also had a rocky time completing its original football field

Grading work being done in 1945 for the original athletic fields at El Cerrito High School — plus a glimpse of the second incarnation of Fairmont Elementary. From home movies taken by Arthur Hopkins and digitized by his son Tom, courtesy of the El Cerrito Historical Society.

El Cerrito residents have had nearly two years to watch the extensive work being done on the new football stadium at El Cerrito High School. The project is The original field, built in 1945 and opened in 1946, did not require environmental reports, seismic and geotechnical studies, or even the design costs of the modern version. And there were hardly any neighbors in the immediate area to object to the project.
Even so, the football field had its own long and literally rocky road to completion.
When El Cerrito High opened in 1941, it had a gymnasium, but no fields for baseball, football or track. That was partly by design, because ECHS opened as a junior and senior high school, with sophomores being the highest class level in 1941, so there were no varsity teams.

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The decision to purchase football uniforms in 1941, two years before El Cerrito High had its first varsity football team, proved financially sound. Restrictions were already in place, as noted in the Berkeley Gazette item above that mentions a new 10 percent excise tax. Wartime rationing would be even more severe by 1943.

For its first two years, the school had junior varsity football only.

ECHS still had no field of its own when the first varsity football team played in 1943, and home games were at the former El Cerrito Kennel Club dog racing track on the historic Castro rancho property where El Cerrito Plaza stands today. The field was leased from racetrack owner John “Black Jack” Jerome, who had turned down a similar request from Albany High School before World War II to lease the site for school sports after the racetrack was closed by the state in January of 1939.
The racetrack grounds had no turf, meaning the first El Cerrito Gaucho teams had to play home football on a field of dirt and rocks. It did, however, provide a nice big grandstand for the fans.

Plans for building athletic fields at El Cerrito High were announced in January of 1945 and they were completed in 1946. It was originally known as Memorial Field, a name largely forgotten today.

An early aerial view of El Cerrito High shows the new campus and the area where the athletic fields would go.

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The Berkeley Gazette reports in January 1942 that El Cerrito High plans to proceed with its plans for a varsity football team the following year despite wartime constraints.

This 1944 ECHS yearbook photo shows football action at the former El Cerrito Kennel Club.

Another view of football at the former El Cerrito Kennel Club, which was surrounded by a trailer court for war workers.

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Plans for the new field are announced in January of 1945 (Berkeley Gazette).

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When it opened after the war, the new football facility at El Cerrito High was known as Memorial Field, which also hosted the school’s track events.


New Berkeley Historical Society exhibit opens with free program Oct. 11

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“Art Capital of the West: Real and Imagined Art Museums and Galleries in Berkeley” is the new exhibit of the Berkeley Historical Society, opening with a program and reception from 2-5 p.m. Oct. 11 at the Berkeley History Center, 1931 Center St. Admission is free, donations are welcome.

When artist Jennie V. Cannon visited Berkeley in 1907, she wrote, “I could not believe my eyes—there were artist groups and displays everywhere—so many fine artists that this place surpasses San Francisco as the art capital of the West.” Coinciding with the opening of the new UC Berkeley Art Museum, the Berkeley Historical Society exhibit explores over a century of hopes, dreams, successes and setbacks of Berkeley art museums and galleries. “Art Capital of the West”: Real and Imagined Art Museums and Galleries in Berkeley will run from October 11, 2015 through April 2, 2016 at the Berkeley History Center in the Veterans Memorial Building, 1931 Center Street, Berkeley.

Details: www.berkeleyhistoricalsociety.org or 510-848-0181.


When Berkeley liked Ike: Presidential candidate made East Bay stops this week in 1952

D. D. Eisenhower

Dwight Eisenhower is met by a crowd of people, including many UC Berkeley students, at the Berkeley railroad station. (Oakland Tribune Photo)

D. D. Eisenhower

Eisenhower, the Republican nominee challenging Adlai Stevenson, made some brief remarks in his Berkeley whistlestop appearance. (Oakland Tribune Photo)

Republican presidential nominee Dwight Eisenhower was given a welcome befitting a war hero by Berkeley residents this week in 1952. The Oct. 8 appearance was part of a whistlestop swing by train through the East Bay on the way to a speech at the Cow Palace by the acclaimed World War II general. Other stops included Vallejo, Crockett and Richmond, along with a rally at City Hall Plaza in Oakland before he went via motorcade across the Bay Bridge to San Francisco and a scheduled speech at the Cow Palace. The appearances were partly a response to a similar trip through the area by Democratic nominee Adlai Stevenson.
Accompanying Eisenhower on his trip through the area were California Gov. Earl Warren and U.S. Sen. William F. Knowland, whose family owned the Oakland Tribune.

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Signs displayed during Eisenhower’s Berkeley visit included “UC likes Ike” and “Let it rain, let it pour, Ike will lead us safely now, he always has before.”

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How Berkeley Iceland kept the rink surface smooth before the Zamboni came along

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When Berkeley Iceland opened in November 1940 the invention of the famed Zamboni ice resurfacing machine, now a fixture at ice and hockey rinks, was still almost nine years away.

So how, you ask, was the rink surface at Berkeley Iceland kept smooth enough for skating? This 1945 photo in the Berkeley Gazette shows the answer — giant squeegees, an adaptation of the window-washing device invented in Oakland in 1936. Note that the smoothing task has been turned over to women skaters during the war.

For those wondering about the prose used by the Berkeley Gazette, “Atalanta is the female athlete in Greek myth” and “didoes” are “mischievous tricks or deeds.”


The first Oakland Raiders game at the new Coliseum was played 49 years ago today

The Oakland Coliseum hosted its first event 49 years ago today, when the Oakland Raiders played the Kansas City Chiefs.

News media tour of the new stadium, nearing completion in July 1966.

The completed Coliseum awaits its first crowd. (Lonnie Wilson / Oakland Tribune Staff Archives).

Action from Sept. 18, 1966 – the first Oakland Raiders game to be played at the newly dedicated Oakland – Alameda County Coliseum. (Russ Reed / Oakland Tribune Staff Archives)

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A rave review of the new stadium from the San Mateo Times, which notes that Charles O. Finley, owner of the Kansas City Athletics of the American League, was among those in attendance.

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Photo coverage of the first Coliseum game from the Hayward Daily Review.


When Mickey Mantle and other baseball stars came to Billy Martin’s night club in El Cerrito

A piece of memorabilia capturing a moment in baseball and El Cerrito history has been listed for bidding at online auction site eBay.
The item is an autographed 1961 menu from the opening of Billy Martin’s Cerro Square, a gala event attended by numerous major league baseball players of the day along with former teammates of Martin’s from the Oakland Oaks of the Pacific Coast League.

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Autographed menu from the opening of Billy Martin’s Cerro Square, offered for auction on eBay.

“Signatures on this menu include Billy Martin, Jim Gentile, Jackie Jensen, Don Drysdale, Mickey Mantle, Bud Foster, Cotton Pippen, Tom Louderback, Ray Larnernno, Woody Hall, Augie Galan,” states the auction listing, reflecting just some of the sporting world figures who attended the event.

At the time of the club opening, the always-combative Martin was nearing the end of his playing career. The Berkeley native, a regular presence in El Cerrito both as a youth and in later years, opened the night club venture at the former New Six Bells owned by the Figone family on San Pablo Avenue at Central Avenue (now a Burger King).

Despite its star-studded opening, the venture was short-lived. The era of clubs and bars that once dominated El Cerrito nightlife for decades was winding down, in part due to the growing presence of television in homes. In addition, according to a former relation of Martin’s by marriage, it wasn’t enough for the ballplayer to have his name on the club — people expected him to be there nightly to greet and talk to them.

cerro square 1961
Longtime Yankees teammates (and carousing pals) Mickey Mantle and Billy Martin, joined by other ballplayers at the opening of Cerro Square in El Cerrito. Photo from the collection of Jack Newell.

Cerro Square matchbook.


Richmond Rosies saluted by their counterparts in Michigan

congrats richmond rosies

Richmond is home to the national tribute to the World War II home front and on Aug. 15 the city set a new world record for a Guinness Book world record for the most women dressed as Rosie the Riveter gathered in one place at one time since the war.
That has earned a salute from the women who previously held the record, accomplished last year at the famed Willow Run Michigan plant that built bombers during the war.
They also issued what amounts to a challenge and could become an annual event.

Sincerest congratulations to the ladies of Richmond, CA on beating our Guinness World Record for the Most Rosie the Riveters. The contribution of Wendy the Welder and other women shipyard workers was essential to victory in WWII, as was the contribution of homefront workers across the nation in every imaginable job. Thank you, Richmond, for joining us in honoring “Rosie” and her sisters. Of course, we hope to bring the record back to Michigan soon, but for now it is in good hands in California!


Berkeley market hosting Aug. 26 benefit event for national park in Richmond


The Whole Foods Market on Gilman Street in Berkeley is hosting an event on Aug. 26 to benefit the Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond.

This is the event announcement from the nonprofit Rosie the Riveter Trust:

You helped us bring over 1,000 people to the Rosie Rally…

so making a grocery run should be a piece of cake!

Please help spread the word! Whole Foods Market and the Trust are working together to support the Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park!

WHAT: Community Support Day to Benefit the Park! Rosie the Riveter Trust will receive 5% of the store’s net proceeds for the day!

WHEN: Wednesday, August 26th from 8 AM to 10 PM… open to close!

WHERE: Whole Foods Market on Gilman St. in Berkeley. Driving directions here.

WHO: You! Support the Park just by making your regular grocery run.

Click the Forward to a Friend button below to help us spread the word!


Visit our table and you could win
a Rosie the Riveter Lunch Box with a
$25.00 Whole Foods Market gift card!

Please help us support amazing Park programs like the Rosie Rally, Rosie’s Girls Summer Camp Program, and the hundreds of ranger talks, docent lectures, expert presentations and documentary screenings that the Park provides to the public completely free each year!

No donation needed- all you have to do is shop, and Whole Foods Market will contribute 5% of the day’s proceeds to Rosie the Riveter Trust!