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Berkeley: Moe’s Books explains why it will be closed on Feb. 17

People gather in front of Moe’s Books on Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley Sunday 4/20/97 during a memorial block party for bookstore owner Moe Moskowitz who died April 1, 1997 at the age of 75. (WEST COUNTY TIMES/EDDIE LEDESMA) wmoe

Moe’s Books on Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley posted the following announcement on its Facebook page to explain why it will be closed on Feb. 17:

 

Dear Friends
Many of you know that a general strike has been planned for February 17th as a way of resisting the Trump administration. Our immediate reaction was to support this action in spirit, but it is difficult for a small business to forfeit even one day’s income. Still, after discussing this with the staff we have decided that we will close the store for the day. We do understand that not everyone can join the strike, but we urge you to spend some time on February 17th thinking about the state of the country, and that you consider resisting this regime in your own way.
Thank you
The management and staff at Moe’s Books
#radicalbookselling

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Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders makes a meal stop on Solano Avenue in Albany

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A patron took these photos of presidential candidate Bernie Sanders at China Village Restaurant on Solano Avenue in Albany.

After a long day of campaigning in the Bay Area on Wednesday, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders and his entourage — including Secret Service agents — stopped for a late night meal at China Village on Solano Avenue. The unannounced appearance quickly drew a crowd of onlookers taking in the scene from outside the restaurant.
“It was worth the wait,” said a woman who was there when Sanders came out of the restaurant after he was done feeling the burn of the Szechuan cuisine. “He was great. He shook hands with everyone.”
Small groups were still outside the restaurant, closed by then, after Sanders departed.

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Adoring crowd on Solano Avenue chants for @BernieSanders Wednesday

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Berkeley District 3 council candidate Mark Coplan outlines his platform

Mark Coplan, retired spokesman for the Berkeley Unified School District and candidate for the District 3 City Council seat, has issued the following statement about his candidacy:

Berkeley Residents: My Platform for Your Review and Consideration

Dear Editor and Berkeley Voice Readers,
I was first asked to consider running for the Council by retired teacher and neighbor Ann Einstein whose endorsement reads, “You don’t have to be an Einstein to know that Mark Coplan is good for our community. You just have to know him.” I would love to have your endorsement as well, and endorsements from friends, neighbors and community leaders are as important to me as those of elected officials and other organizations usually considered critical to a successful campaign, maybe more.

I do not plan to run a traditional campaign, and in fact I am committed to not adding to the offensive stack of junk mail that will flood your recycling bin, and my volunteers and I will be knocking on your door with green-friendly literature to personally ask for your vote instead. I intend to serve District 3 residents diligently, but I’m reaching out to all Berkeley residents as I intend for my service to positively impact all of our fine city.

I am not a career politician, but I have spent my adult life in public service, and what I have to offer is very clear – Service and Commitment. As the Public Information Officer for the Berkeley Unified School District, my energy and passion has helped me to better serve parents and staff, who have always asked, “How can you be everywhere?” Deeply committed to my community, I will bring that energy to District 3 and will commit full time as a Councilperson. I have a reputation of working effectively with all sides of the issues, with a keen ability to listen to all viewpoints and identify mutual ground and consensus. I can work with people to collectively define and implement our best ideas – and I have a reputation for being trustworthy. I will state my positions clearly and vote decisively, insuring that my constituents always know exactly where I stand.

My 20 years of serving BUSD, as a very active parent and in the administration, have given me a solid, strong understanding of protocols, public process, transparency, and a foundation for a window into the workings of city government. I’m just beginning to look more closely at some of our city issues, and I’m seeing some practical solutions that I will be drafting up to share. Furthermore, I have established professional relationships with most of our elected officials, from the local, county, to the state level, their staff, and with City of Berkeley administrators and staff.

I am sensitive to the unique issues of south Berkeley, such as racism, shootings, police relations and the impact of gentrification and redistricting which have transformed District 3’s composition. We have people of all colors, conservative and progressive pockets of young and older families, hipsters, and university students. I will visit our District 3 businesses monthly and hold regular community meetings, and listen to my District’s concerns. I intend to adopt all of the schools in District 3 and participate in their school communities, and I’ll encourage the rest of the Council to do the same (Full disclosure – Daryl Moore did it first).

I have earned community respect on all levels, and I am known for respecting everyone, including those I may disagree with. I will not allow discord with fellow councilmembers to impact my desire to find equitable solutions or mar my positive attitude. Although I may debate passionately for my neighbors, I will not disparage or attack anyone with differing views, in public or in private.
I encourage you to contact me directly with your questions and your support at markcoplan.district3@gmail.com.

Sincerely,
Mark Coplan, City Council Candidate for District 3

Mark Coplan Dec 2015 01

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El Cerrito Democratic Club hosting talk on cannabis reform on Aug. 25

The El Cerrito Democratic Club will host a talk by Sean Donahoe on “Cannabis Policy Reform in California” at its meeting at 6 p.m. Aug. 25 at 545 Ashbury Ave. in El Cerrito.

Donahoe is a cannabis policy reform advocate and owner of Operative Campaigns LLC.

Donahoe is an Oakland resident who co-founded the California Cannabis Industry Association in early 2013 after years of political consulting. He “is regularly in the Capitol or traveling around the state, speaking with activists and electeds while organizing this industry with an activist mindset. In addition to his work with CCIA, he helped write the United Food and Commercial Workers national organizing plan for the cannabis industry, served on the executive board of the Coalition for Cannabis Policy Reform, created several political action committees, and advised several local ballot measure committees last year. He currently serves on the City of Oakland’s Cannabis Regulatory Commission and has a monthly political article in Culture magazine.”

The meeting is open to the public.
The meeting starts with a 6 p.m. social time, followed by club announcements before the talk by Donahoe at 6:30 p.m.

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Richmond: SS Red Oak Victory will mark 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War on April 9

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The Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park in Richmond is joining other units of the National Park Service in commemorating the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War on April 9.
In most NPS locations the surrender of the Confederacy to the Union will be marked by the ringing of a bell at 12:15 p.m. local time.
In Richmond, the moment will be marked by blowing the whistle on the SS Red Oak Victory for four minutes. The observance is open to the public.
The National Park Service is encouraging organizations and individuals to take part in the observance with their own bell-ringing. Below is the full announcement.

NPS Commemorates the 150th Anniversary of The End of The Civil War

For the past four years, the National Park Service and many other organizations and individuals have been commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War and the continuing efforts for human rights today. On April 9, 1865, Union General Ulysses S. Grant met Confederate General Robert E. Lee to set terms of surrender of Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. In commemoration of this historic event, the SS Red Oak Victory Ship will blow the ship’s whistle for 4 minutes. Each minute represents the end of four years of bloodshed during the Civil War.

Join the National Park Service and participate in the ringing of the bell at 12:15 on April 9, 2015. Churches, temples, schools, city halls, public buildings, and others are invited to ring bells at that time as a gesture to mark the end of the conflict in which more than 750,000 Americans perished.

The SS Red Oak Victory Ship is the last remaining ship of the 747 ships built in the Richmond Kaiser Shipyards during World War II. The ship is owned and operated by the Richmond Museum Association and partners with the National Park Service in preserving the history of the American WWII Home Front. The ship is open Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and most Sundays, from 10:00am to 3:00pm. Call (510) 237-2933 for more information.

The Rosie the Riveter Visitor Education Center is open seven days a week from 10 AM to 5 PM and is located at 1414 Harbour Way South, suite 3000, Richmond, CA 94804. For more information and directions to the Visitor Education Center, please call (510) 232-5050 x0 or visit to http://www.nps.gov/rori/planyourvisit/directions.htm. Admission to the Visitor Center and all park sites and programs is free.

If you would like to receive information about upcoming park events, visit www.rosietheriveter.org and sign up for the email newsletter. The Rosie the Riveter Trust is the nonprofit association that is building a community of support for this national park

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San Pablo: Why Doctor’s Medical Center hasn’t closed yet — a commentary by Dr. Sharon Drager

Why DMC Hasn’t Closed Yet

By Dr. Sharon Drager

If money were the only consideration, DMC would have closed years ago. Its financial challenges are no different than they have been. Hospitals close all the time; however, except for rural hospitals, there are usually other hospitals in the community to pick up the slack. So when Los Medanos closed, Sutter Delta was just down the road; the community still had a hospital and most of the medical staff was intact. The situation in West County is different, and everyone knows it. That’s why there’s a reluctance to see it close. DMC is not just the only public hospital in West County, it’s the ONLY hospital except for a Kaiser facility that has to take anyone who shows up in the emergency room, but is not open to the public for anything else.

Hospitals are ecosystems, not just inpatient facilities. In West County a medical community rich in specialists has grown up around DMC and cares for a community that has a high burden of chronic illness. So, when the hospital closes, so does the Cancer Center (radiation and chemotherapy), a busy Wound Care Center, advanced heart attack care, advanced comprehensive care for dialysis patients and comprehensive care for surrounding nursing homes, among other services.

Physicians won’t practice for long in offices surrounding a dead hospital. Many surgical specialists cluster around hospitals, which are their work places. They will disappear form West County and won’t be replaced.

The Hospital Council’s assertions that an Urgent Care Center will fulfill the needs of the community are disingenuous. Yes, many patients visiting any ER can be treated as outpatients, but many require advanced imaging, consultations and fairly aggressive treatment to allow them to go home. Urgent Care centers associated with hospital systems do can work like this but not small stand-alone units attached only to primary care clinics.

West County is in a relatively isolated position for an urban community as far as heart attack care is concerned. Without DMC, heart attack patients whether they’re Kaiser members or non-Kaiser members and whether they live in Richmond or Kensington have to be transported to Concord or Oakland. A 10-minute trip becomes an eternity.

The new hospital model for West County residents will be strictly 20th century, not up to date. Patients who require inpatient care will be treated episodically at whatever institution has room for them, often with a new set of specialists every admission. Kaiser has a vaunted coordinated care system, which applies only to its members. The default mode for non-members at Kaiser hospitals is “treat and street.” Pat Frost can argue that no one has yet died in an ambulance, but I know complicated patients who died because they were shipped to unfamiliar hospitals.

Finally, while I hope the community will consider a parcel tax, it is grossly unfair to tell West County residents that they don’t merit a hospital because they didn’t support another parcel tax. No one, including the editorial board of the Contra Costa Times, has ever suggested that residents of Walnut Creek or San Ramon or Antioch don’t deserve a hospital because they don’t pay a property tax. I guess those people are just luckier.

Dr. Sharon Drager is a vascular surgery doctor in San Pablo.