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Press release: Richmond ACCE fundraiser at Nevin Center

PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 4, 2013

Richmond, CA

 

Re: Community Empowerment Film

 

Fundraiser Plans

 

The Richmond chapter of the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE) is having a fundraiser at The Nevin Center,

 

 

598 Nevin Avenue in Richmond, California on May 15

 

from 6:30-8:30 PM.

 

ACCE works in California communities to support people as they fight to keep their homes from illegal bank practices and foreclosure. ACCE also works for Universal Health Care, an end to blight and abandoned property, stands up at the city council meetings and meets with city officials to discuss the needs and issues that face the largely underserved community of Richmond.

 

“For the past two years I have worked with ACCE and now I am the

State representative for the Richmond Chapter. I am so proud to protect the people I live and work with in Richmond and fight for justice,” explained Doug Gilbert, ACCE activist.

 

The two short documentary films, “Community Empowerment”, and

Wells Fargo Protest March” produced by Sharon Collins, Stephanie Slade and Gini Graham Scott of United Media Productions, reflect the story of ACCE, its mission, vision and actions.

 

In addition to the films, the first ACCE Community Empowerment Award will be presented to honor

 

 

Mayor Gayle McLaughlin for her outstanding leadership, producing innovative solutions with an open door to ACCE.

 

Meet and greet your community leaders. Support the people who work to make

 

Richmond a better place to live and work. Join the sponsors supporting this important

 

community event including Unlimited Property Services, Inc., EnviroViews Landscaping,

 

Collins Management, Slade Digital, Clear View Realty, Changemakers Publishing,

 

Discolandia, and USCW Union Local 5 and Roots Force Productions. Call Dave Sharples

 

of ACCE at

 

 

415-377-9037 or Sharon Collins at 510-693-7886

for tickets, community

partner tables and sponsorship opportunity.

 

 

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March on Richmond bank scheduled for Wednesday

PRESS ADVISORY

Embargoed until Wednesday, December 12th

For more information contact David Sharples, ACCE, 415-377-9037, dsharples@calorganize.org

Homeowners and Activists to March on Richmond Wells Fargo, Occupy the Bank and Demand Affordable Loan Modification and Principal Reduction for Struggling Richmond Homeowner

The group will tell Wells CEO John Stumpf to stop being a Grinch and will sing Christmas Carols like “Arrest ye Merry Bankermen!”

RICHMOND, CA – Members of the community group ACCE, Occupy Activists and other concerned Richmond residents will join Eloisa Mendoza, a struggling Richmond Homeowner, as she marches to a Wells Fargo branch and demands an affordable loan modification and principal reduction.

What: Action on Richmond, CA Wells Fargo

When: Wednesday, December 12th, 5pm

Where: Wells Fargo, 4300 MacDonald Ave, Richmond, CA

ACCE is calling on the major banks to stop being community killers and instead institute policies that put homeownership before foreclosure by using principal reduction as a core strategy to save homes and reboot the economy.

In addition, ACCE is calling on President Obama to get Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to institute a real principal reduction program and Replace Ed DeMarco as head of the Federal Housing Finance Agency that oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE) is a multi-racial, democratic, non-profit community organization building power in low to moderate income neighborhoods to stand and fight for social, economic and racial justice. ACCE has chapters in eleven counties across the State of California. For more information visit

http://www.calorganize.org/ or follow ACCE on twitter @CalOrganize

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ACCE press releases accuse Richmond officials of delaying housing plan

Here are the press releases issued by ACCE, with dates:

HEADLINE: Richmond City Manager Moves Adoption of Housing Element to January 15th for Political Reasons, Community Groups Advocate for Rent Stabilization, Affordable Housing and Blight Mitigation

Sent: Mon 12/3/2012 11:56 AM

Media Advisory

For Immediate Release

Contact: David Sharples (415) 377-9037

Richmond City Manager Moves Adoption of Housing Element to January 15th for Political Reasons, Community Groups Advocate for Rent Stabilization, Affordable Housing and Blight Mitigation

RICHMOND, CA – The Richmond City Manager and Planning Staff has decided to not bring the Housing Element to the City Council for adoption on Dec. 4th as originally planned but will rather wait until Jan. 15th. This is because the city manager want the new Richmond city council, which will be more conservative and less amenable to REDI’s progressive Housing policy recommendations, to adopt the Housing element without including REDI’s recommendations. Despite the City Manager’s political maneuvers community groups will still turn out to the December 4th City Council hearing to advocate in support of much needed housing reforms. The Housing Element is a critically important state-mandated document to assess a city’s housing needs, production and site availability. As part of advancing its equitable development platform, the REDI (Richmond Equitable Development Initiative) coalition, a coalition of Richmond community based organizations, has been involved in education and engaging residents to provide policy recommendations that help Richmond’s historically under-served populations and neighborhoods. REDI’s policy priorities have since been approved and recommended for adoption by the Richmond Planning Commission on November 1st.

REDI’s policy priorities include:

Stronger renter protections via Just Cause and Rent Stabilization

More affordable housing production via amending the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance

Foreclosure and blight mitigation via adoption of a Vacant Property Registration Ordinance

As REDI and ACCE leader Melvin Willis said “It is crucial that the Richmond City Council adopt the Housing Element with REDI’s recommendations. We need more affordable housing, protections for tenants and to strengthen Richmond’s blight program. 50% of Richmond residents are tenants. We need to protect them from unfair evictions. Its also crucial that we adopt the Vacant Property Registration Ordinance so that the city can track who owns these vacant, foreclosed, blighted properties that are destabilizing our neighborhoods.”

 

When: 5:30 pm Tuesday December 4th Press Conference followed by 6:30 pm City Council Meeting

 

Where: Richmond City Hall, City Council Chambers, 440 Civic Center Plaza, Richmond, CA

 

What: A press conference followed by a City Council Hearing. Dozens of community leaders will turnout to testify in support of adoption of the Housing Element ________________________________________

 

From: David Sharples

 

Sent: Friday, November 30, 2012 1:49 AM

 

To: David Sharples

 

Subject: Media Advisory: Richmond City Council to Adopt Housing Element, Community Groups Advocate for Rent Stabilization, Affordable Housing and Blight Mitigation

 

Media Advisory

 

For Immediate Release

 

Contact: David Sharples (415) 377-9037

 

Richmond City Council to Adopt Housing Element, Community Groups Advocate for Rent Stabilization, Affordable Housing and Blight Mitigation

 

RICHMOND, CA – The Richmond City Council will vote to adopt the 2007-2014 Housing Element on December 4th. The Housing Element is a critically important state-mandated document to assess a city’s housing needs, production and site availability. As part of advancing its equitable development platform, the REDI (Richmond Equitable Development Initiative) coalition, a coalition of Richmond community based organizations, has been involved in education and engaging residents to provide policy recommendations that help Richmond’s historically under-served populations and neighborhoods. REDI’s policy priorities have since been approved and recommended for adoption by the Richmond Planning Commission on November 1st.

 

REDI’s policy priorities include:

 

Stronger renter protections via Just Cause and Rent Stabilization

More affordable housing production via amending the Inclusionary Housing Ordinance

Foreclosure and blight mitigation via adoption of a Vacant Property Registration Ordinance

As REDI and ACCE leader Melvin Willis said “It is crucial that the Richmond City Council adopt the Housing Element with REDI’s recommendations. We need more affordable housing, protections for tenants and to strengthen Richmond’s blight program. 50% of Richmond residents are tenants. We need to protect them from unfair evictions. Its also crucial that we adopt the Vacant Property Registration Ordinance so that the city can track who owns these vacant, foreclosed, blighted properties that are destabilizing our neighborhoods.”

 

When: 5:30 pm Tuesday December 4th Press Conference followed by 6:30 pm City Council Meeting

 

Where: Richmond City Hall, City Council Chambers, 440 Civic Center Plaza, Richmond, CA

 

What: A press conference followed by a City Council Hearing. Dozens of community leaders will turnout to testify in support of adoption of the Housing Element

 

 

 

Policy Detail

 

KEEP HOMES AFFORDABLE AND SAFE

 

H-1 3.2 Amend Inclusionary Housing Ordinance Strengthen inclusionary housing provisions to limit circumstances under which developers can pay in-lieu fees instead of building affordable housing, and we support increasing the amount of in-lieu fees to fully cover the cost of constructing new units.

 

H-1 3.4 Community Land Trust

 

Expedite the development of a community land trust to stabilize neighborhoods and increase the supply of affordable housing.

 

 

 

KEEP NEIGHBORHOODS CLEAN AND SAFE

 

H-2 5.3 Vacant Foreclosed Residential Property Ordinance Adopt an ordinance that would require the registration of vacant foreclosed properties, which would collect fees and track maintenance and bank ownership in conjunction with code enforcement.

 

H-2 5.4 Code Enforcement for Residential Neighborhoods Use code enforcement to rehabilitate substandard rental housing without displacing existing residents or raising their rents. Reduce foreclosure blight by aggressively enforcing SB 1137 to make banks maintain foreclosed properties or pay the $1000 per day fine. The fines collected should be allocated toward foreclosure prevention or foreclosure buy-back efforts. The City should collect data on a bank-by-bank basis regarding foreclosures, loan modifications, substandard housing conditions and blight so that the City can track whether or not banks are in compliance with the State of California’s Homeowner Bill of Rights.

 

 

 

KEEP FAMILIES IN THEIR HOMES

 

H-4 2.2 Just Cause for Eviction

 

Establish rent control measures that include Just Cause and Fair Rent ordinances for all tenants, which protects against unjust or arbitrary evictions by defining fair reasons for evictions. Rent Control should also stabilize and regulate rents.

 

H-4 2.3 Rent Stabilization Ordinance

 

Adopt an ordinance to establish rent stabilization policies and a rent board that will register landlords and hear and resolve landlord-tenant disputes.